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Can Imperfect Competition Explain the Difference between Primal and Dual Productivity Measures? Estimates for U.S. Manufacturing

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  • Roeger, Werner

Abstract

It is well known that, under the assumptions of constant returns to scale, perfect competition, and the absence of factor hoarding, primal and dual productivity measures should be highly correlated. The apparent lack of correlation is usually attributed to fixed factors of production. In this paper, the author proposes an alternative explanation by relaxing the assumption of perfect competition. By controlling for the presence of a markup component, the author demonstrates that both productivity measures are in fact highly correlated for U.S. manufacturing. The analysis also provides an alternative method of estimating a markup of prices over marginal cost. Copyright 1995 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Roeger, Werner, 1995. "Can Imperfect Competition Explain the Difference between Primal and Dual Productivity Measures? Estimates for U.S. Manufacturing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(2), pages 316-330, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:103:y:1995:i:2:p:316-30
    DOI: 10.1086/261985
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    References listed on IDEAS

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