IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ucp/jlabec/v5y1987i1p20-42.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

An Empirical Study of Long-term Unemployment in Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Trivedi, P K
  • Hui, W T

Abstract

The first part of this paper concentrates on modeling transitions out of unemployment using aggregated gross flow data. Models are estimated using monthly transition probabilities for March-April 1984. This analysis produces evidence consistent with negative duration dependence but sheds no light on the role of macroeconomic factors. The second part focuses on this issue. A time-series analysis of the proportion of long-term unemployment, using data for four age and sex groups, provides evidence that a proportionately has been associated with reduction in job availability. Copyright 1987 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Trivedi, P K & Hui, W T, 1987. "An Empirical Study of Long-term Unemployment in Australia," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(1), pages 20-42, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:5:y:1987:i:1:p:20-42
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/298135
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers. See http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Pieter Serneels, 2002. "Explaining Non-Negative Duration Dependence Among the Unemployed," CSAE Working Paper Series 2002-13, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Pieter Serneels, 2004. "The Nature of Unemployment in Urban Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 2004-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Outi Aarnio, 1989. "On the effects of duration on Finnish unemployment," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 65-81, Spring.
    4. Gary Marks & John Ainley, 1999. "School Achievement and Labour Market Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 408, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    5. Oberholzer-Gee, Felix, 2008. "Nonemployment stigma as rational herding: A field experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 30-40, January.
    6. Jeff Borland, 2000. "Disaggregated Models of Unemployment in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2000n16, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:5:y:1987:i:1:p:20-42. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.