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The Extra Burden of Moslem Wives: Clues from Israeli Women's Labor Supply


  • Grossbard-Shechtman, Shoshana
  • Neuman, Shoshana


This paper examines differences in the labour supply of women of different religions in Israel. We estimate religious differentials in the effect of husband’s income, number of children, education, and age on married women’s labour supply. It is suggested that labour supply patterns of wives from different religious backgrounds may reveal differences in the institutions which different religious groups have established to regulate marriage and divorce. Our results suggest that Christian marital institutions are closer to Jewish marital institutions than they are to Moslem marital institutions. Moslem women appear to be less likely to translate their resources into a higher value of time in marriage than either Christian women or Jewish women. Educated Moslem women seem to have fewer constraints on their marriages than their uneducated counterparts.
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  • Grossbard-Shechtman, Shoshana & Neuman, Shoshana, 1998. "The Extra Burden of Moslem Wives: Clues from Israeli Women's Labor Supply," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(3), pages 491-517, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:46:y:1998:i:3:p:491-517

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hajj, Mandana & Panizza, Ugo, 2009. "Religion and education gender gap: Are Muslims different?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 337-344, June.
    2. Danziger, Leif & Neuman, Shoshana, 1999. "On the age at marriage: theory and evidence from Jews and Moslems in Israel," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 179-193, October.
    3. Victoria Vernon, 2010. "Marriage: for love, for money…and for time?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 433-457, December.
    4. Anaman, Kwabena A. & Kassim, Hartinie M., 2006. "Marriage and female labour supply in Brunei Darussalam: A case study of urban women in Bandar Seri Begawan," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 797-812, October.
    5. Ruttan, Vernon W., 2001. "Imperialism and competition in anthropology, sociology, political science and economics: a perspective from development economics," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 15-29, January.
    6. Jennifer Olmsted, 2002. "Assessing the Impact of Religion on Gender Status," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 99-111.
    7. Shoshana Grossbard-Shechtman & Xuanning Fu, 2002. "Women's Labor Force Participation and Status Exchange in Intermarriage: A Model and Evidence for Hawaii 1," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 241-268, October.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply


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