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Accounting for Racial Differences in School Attendance in the American South, 1900: The Role of Separate-but-Equal

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  • Margo, Robert A

Abstract

Everyone knows that public school officials in the American South violated the Supreme Court's separate-but-equal decision. But did the violations matter? Yes, enforcement of separate-but-equal would have narrowed racial differences in school attendance in the early-twentieth-century South. But separate-but-equal was not enough. Black children still would have attended school less often than white children because black parents were poorer and less literate than white parents. Copyright 1987 by MIT Press.

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  • Margo, Robert A, 1987. "Accounting for Racial Differences in School Attendance in the American South, 1900: The Role of Separate-but-Equal," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(4), pages 661-666, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:69:y:1987:i:4:p:661-66
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    1. Claudia Goldin, 1978. "Household and Market Production of Families in a Late Nineteenth Century American City," Working Papers 495, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    2. Goldin, Claudia, 1979. "Household and market production of families in a late nineteenth century American city," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 111-131, April.
    3. Landes, William M. & Solmon, Lewis C., 1972. "Compulsory Schooling Legislation: An Economic Analysis of Law and Social Change in the Nineteenth Century," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(01), pages 54-91, March.
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    1. repec:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/690944 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Funkhouser, Edward, 1999. "Cyclical economic conditions and school attendance in Costa Rica," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 31-50, February.
    3. Collins, William J. & Margo, Robert A., 2006. "Historical Perspectives on Racial Differences in Schooling in the United States," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    4. Celeste K. Carruthers & Marianne H. Wanamaker, 2017. "Separate and Unequal in the Labor Market: Human Capital and the Jim Crow Wage Gap," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 655-696.
    5. Moehling, Carolyn M., 2004. "Family structure, school attendance, and child labor in the American South in 1900 and 1910," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 73-100, January.

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