IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/oxdevs/v26y1998i2p171-190.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Who gets what jobs in China's countryside? A multinomial logit analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Sarah Cook

Abstract

Asset-poor rural households increase their incomes primarily through the transfer of labour into activities which yield higher returns. This paper examines the determinants of job status among members of rural households in China's transitional economy. The objective is to gain a better understanding of who gains access to higher paying employment, thereby increasing their incomes, and the constraints which prevent other individuals or households from improving their economic position. Two hypotheses are investigated: first, that household demographic composition affects individual employment decisions, with farm households pursuing a strategy to allocate labour among different types of employment; and second, that non-market mechanisms such as political connections play a role in determining employment outcomes. The results demonstrate the importance of individual characteristics, particularly age and gender, as well as a continuing role for non-market mechanisms in the transfer of labour into more remunerative activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Cook, 1998. "Who gets what jobs in China's countryside? A multinomial logit analysis," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 171-190.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:oxdevs:v:26:y:1998:i:2:p:171-190
    DOI: 10.1080/13600819808424152
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13600819808424152
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Khandker, S.R., 1992. "Earnings, Occupational Choice, and Mobility in Segmented Labor Markets of India," World Bank - Discussion Papers 154, World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Vendryes, 2011. "Migration constraints and development: Hukou and capital accumulation in China," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00783794, HAL.
    2. Vendryes, Thomas, 2011. "Migration constraints and development: Hukou and capital accumulation in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 669-692.
    3. Bowlus, Audra J. & Sicular, Terry, 2003. "Moving toward markets? Labor allocation in rural China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 561-583, August.
    4. Lu, Zhigang & Song, Shunfeng, 2006. "Rural-urban migration and wage determination: The case of Tianjin, China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 337-345.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:oxdevs:v:26:y:1998:i:2:p:171-190. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/CODS20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.