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Information Manipulation Through the Media


  • Hanjoon Michael Jung


This article models media manipulation in which a sender or senders manipulate information through the media to influence receivers. This article shows that if there is only 1 sender who has a conditional preference for maintaining its credibility in reporting accurate information and if the receivers face a coordination situation without information about their opponents' types, the sender could influence the receivers to make decisions according to the sender's primary preference by manipulating the information through the media, which makes the report common knowledge. This is true even when the sender and the receivers have contradictory primary preferences. This result extends to the cases in which the sender has imperfect information or in which the sender's primary preference is to maintain its credibility. In the case of multiple senders, however, when there is enough competition among the senders or when simultaneous reporting takes place, the receivers could play their favored outcome against senders' preferences, which sheds light on a solution to the media manipulation problem.

Suggested Citation

  • Hanjoon Michael Jung, 2009. "Information Manipulation Through the Media," Journal of Media Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(4), pages 188-210.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jmedec:v:22:y:2009:i:4:p:188-210 DOI: 10.1080/08997760903375886

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mitchel Y. Abolafia (ed.), 2005. "Markets," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2788.
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    3. Jack H. Beebe, 1977. "Institutional Structure and Program Choices in Television Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 91(1), pages 15-37.
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    5. Papandrea, Franco, 1997. "Modelling television programming choices," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 203-218, September.
    6. Roson Roberto, 2005. "Two-Sided Markets: A Tentative Survey," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 1-19, June.
    7. Anthony Dukes, 2004. "The Adverstising Market in a Product Oligopoly," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 327-348, September.
    8. Simon P. Anderson & Stephen Coate, 2005. "Market Provision of Broadcasting: A Welfare Analysis," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(4), pages 947-972.
    9. Michael Spence & Bruce Owen, 1977. "Television Programming, Monopolistic Competition, and Welfare," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 91(1), pages 103-126.
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