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The Effect of Curriculum-Based External Exit Exam Systems on Student Achievement


  • John H. Bishop


Two presidents, the National Governors Association, and numerous blue-ribbon panels have called for the development of state or national content standards for core subjects and examinations that assess student achievement of these standards. The Competitiveness Policy Council (1993, 30), for example, advocated that "external assessments be given to individual students at the secondary level and that the results should be a major but not exclusive factor qualifying for college and better jobs at better wages." It is claimed that curriculum-based external exit exam systems (CBEEESs) based on explicit content standards will improve the teaching and learning of core subjects. What evidence is there for this claim? Outside the United States, such systems are the rule, not the exception. What impacts have such systems had on school policies, teaching, and student learning?

Suggested Citation

  • John H. Bishop, 1998. "The Effect of Curriculum-Based External Exit Exam Systems on Student Achievement," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 171-182, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:29:y:1998:i:2:p:171-182 DOI: 10.1080/00220489809597951

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Watts, Michael & Bosshardt, William, 1991. "How Instructors Make a Difference: Panel Data Estimates from Principles of Economic Courses," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 336-340, May.
    2. Watts, Michael & Lynch, Gerald J, 1989. "The Principles Courses Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 236-241, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marianne Ferber, 1999. "Guidelines For Pre-College Economics Education: A Critique," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 135-142.
    2. Liang Choon Wang, 2016. "The effect of high-stakes testing on suicidal ideation of teenagers with reference-dependent preferences," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(2), pages 345-364, April.

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