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Carbon Trading: Accounting and Reporting Issues

Author

Listed:
  • Jan Bebbington
  • Carlos Larrinaga-Gonzalez

Abstract

The impetus for this special debating forum arises from the concern about the impact of anthropogenic induced global climate change (GCC) and the assumption that GCC raises issues of significance with respect to the accountability of firms to stakeholders for financial and non-financial performance. Governments and supra-national bodies have sought to respond to GCC in a variety of ways, with the creation of markets in which carbon may be traded being just one manifestation. Carbon markets have the effect of putting a price on what was until very recently free and this change is likely to have financial consequences for firms in the longer term. In order to place the accounting implications of carbon markets in context, the paper provides a scientific and policy introduction to GCC. As regards accounting issues, the paper reviews the problems that are associated with the valuation of pollution allowances and their identification as assets (and the liabilities that arise if companies pollute beyond allowed levels). A closer inspection of the risks and uncertainties that arise from GCC initiates a discussion of non-financial accounting and reporting about carbon. Non-financial reporting is necessary to allow conditions for democratic accountability in an uncertain setting.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Bebbington & Carlos Larrinaga-Gonzalez, 2008. "Carbon Trading: Accounting and Reporting Issues," European Accounting Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 697-717.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:euract:v:17:y:2008:i:4:p:697-717
    DOI: 10.1080/09638180802489162
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. J.I. Gorospe- Oviedo & A.I. Mateos- Ansótegui, 2012. "Related party transactions and emissions rights: accounting and direct international taxation," Chapters,in: Carbon Pricing, Growth and the Environment, chapter 8, pages 117-131 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Talbot, David & Boiral, Olivier, 2013. "Can we trust corporates GHG inventories? An investigation among Canada's large final emitters," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 1075-1085.
    3. Markus J. Milne & Suzana Grubnic, 2011. "Climate change accounting research: keeping it interesting and different," Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 24(8), pages 948-977, October.
    4. Roger L. Burritt & Stefan Schaltegger & Dimitar Zvezdov, 2011. "Carbon Management Accounting: Explaining Practice in Leading German Companies," Australian Accounting Review, CPA Australia, vol. 21(1), pages 80-98, March.
    5. Inha Oh & Yeongjun Yeo & Jeong-Dong Lee, 2015. "Efficiency versus Equality: Comparing Design Options for Indirect Emissions Accounting in the Korean Emissions Trading Scheme," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(11), pages 1-21, November.
    6. Charles Cho & Martin Martens & Hakkyun Kim & Michelle Rodrigue, 2011. "Astroturfing Global Warming: It Isn’t Always Greener on the Other Side of the Fence," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 104(4), pages 571-587, December.
    7. Frank Hartmann & Paolo Perego & Anna Young, 2013. "Carbon Accounting: Challenges for Research in Management Control and Performance Measurement," Abacus, Accounting Foundation, University of Sydney, vol. 49(4), pages 539-563, December.
    8. Bebbington, Jan & Larrinaga, Carlos, 2014. "Accounting and sustainable development: An exploration," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 395-413.
    9. repec:hur:ijarbs:v:7:y:2017:i:12:p:222-240 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Apergis, Nicholas & Eleftheriou, Sofia & Payne, James E., 2013. "The relationship between international financial reporting standards, carbon emissions, and R&D expenditures: Evidence from European manufacturing firms," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 57-66.
    11. Janine Hogan & Sumit Lodhia, 2011. "Sustainability reporting and reputation risk management: an Australian case study," International Journal of Accounting and Information Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 19(3), pages 267-287, September.
    12. Roger L. Burritt & Stefan Schaltegger, 2010. "Sustainability accounting and reporting: fad or trend?," Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 23(7), pages 829-846, September.
    13. Hopwood, Anthony G., 2009. "Accounting and the environment," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 34(3-4), pages 433-439, April.
    14. Haque Shamima & Islam Muhammad Azizul, 2015. "Stakeholder pressures on corporate climate change-related accountability and disclosures: Australian evidence," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 355-390, August.
    15. Kathleen Herbohn & Julie Walker & Huay Yien Monica Loo, 2014. "Corporate Social Responsibility: The Link Between Sustainability Disclosure and Sustainability Performance," Abacus, Accounting Foundation, University of Sydney, vol. 50(4), pages 422-459, December.
    16. Peter Warwick & Chew Ng, 2012. "The ‘Cost’ of Climate Change: How Carbon Emissions Allowances are Accounted for Amongst European Union Companies," Australian Accounting Review, CPA Australia, vol. 22(1), pages 54-67, March.
    17. Yang Stephanie Liu & Xiaoyan Zhou & Jessica Yang & Andreas Hoepner, 2016. "Corporate Carbon Emission and Financial Performance: Does Carbon Disclosure Mediate the Relationship in the UK?," ICMA Centre Discussion Papers in Finance icma-dp2016-03, Henley Business School, Reading University.

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