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An empirical study of the spin-off effects of military spending

Author

Listed:
  • Trish Kelly
  • Meenakshi Rishi

Abstract

The article explores the spin-off effect controversy surrounding the role of military spending in economic development by investigating its impact on output in six industries linked to the military. The article's econometric investigation does not support the case for spin-off effects. The results suggest that military spending's direct impact on output in each industry is negative or insignificant depending on whether adjustments for trade in armaments are made. The results also fail to substantiate physical and human capital spin-off effects. Based on these results, the article concludes that the case for spin-off effects has been exaggerated.

Suggested Citation

  • Trish Kelly & Meenakshi Rishi, 2003. "An empirical study of the spin-off effects of military spending," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 1-17.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:14:y:2003:i:1:p:1-17
    DOI: 10.1080/10242690302938
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "A Cross-Country Study of Growth, Saving, and Government," NBER Chapters,in: National Saving and Economic Performance, pages 271-304 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    4. Trish Kelly, 1997. "Public Investment and Growth: testing the non-linearity hypothesis," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 249-262.
    5. LaCivita, Charles J. & Frederiksen, Peter C., 1991. "Defense spending and economic growth An alternative approach to the causality issue," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 117-126, January.
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    12. Faini, Riccardo & Annez, Patricia & Taylor, Lance, 1984. "Defense Spending, Economic Structure, and Growth: Evidence among Countries and Over Time," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 487-498, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Martínez González & Nuria Rueda López, 2013. "A Productivity And Efficiency Analysis Of The Security And Defence Technological And Industrial Base In Spain," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 147-171, April.

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