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Linkage measures of the construction sector using the hypothetical extraction method

Author

Listed:
  • Yu Song
  • Chunlu Liu
  • Craig Langston

Abstract

The hypothetical extraction method (HEM) is used to extract a sector hypothetically from an economic system and examine the influence of this extraction on other sectors in the economy. Linkage measures based on the HEM become increasingly prominent. However, little construction linkage research applies the HEM. Using the recently published Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development input-output database at constant prices, this research applies the HEM to the construction sector in order to explore the role of this sector in national economies and the quantitative interdependence between the construction sector and the remaining sectors. The output differences before and after the hypothetical extraction reflect the linkages of the construction sector. Empirical results show a declining trend of the total, backward and forward linkages, which confirms the decreasing role of the construction sector with economic maturity over the examined period from a new angle. Analytical results reveal that the unique nature of the construction sector and multifold external factors are the main reasons for the linkage difference between countries. Moreover, hypothesis-testing results consider statistically that the extraction structures employed in this research are appropriate to analyse the linkages of the construction sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Yu Song & Chunlu Liu & Craig Langston, 2006. "Linkage measures of the construction sector using the hypothetical extraction method," Construction Management and Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(6), pages 579-589.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:conmgt:v:24:y:2006:i:6:p:579-589
    DOI: 10.1080/01446190500435358
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Polenske, Karen R & Sivitanides, Petros, 1990. "Linkages in the Construction Sector," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 24(2), pages 147-161.
    5. Chan Swee Lean, 2001. "Empirical tests to discern linkages between construction and other economic sectors in Singapore," Construction Management and Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 355-363.
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    Cited by:

    1. Scott Kelly & Peter Tyler & Douglas Crawford-Brown, 2016. "Exploring Vulnerability and Interdependency of UK Infrastructure Using Key-Linkages Analysis," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 865-892, September.
    2. Umed Temurshoev, 2010. "Identifying Optimal Sector Groupings With The Hypothetical Extraction Method," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(4), pages 872-890.
    3. Peiteng Shi & Jiang Zhang & Bo Yang & Jingfei Luo, 2014. "Hierarchicality of Trade Flow Networks Reveals Complexity of Products," Papers 1401.3103, arXiv.org.
    4. Honghao Ren & Henk Folmer & Arno Vlist, 2014. "What role does the real estate–construction sector play in China’s regional economy?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(3), pages 839-857, May.
    5. Wang, Yuan & Wang, Wenqin & Mao, Guozhu & Cai, Hua & Zuo, Jian & Wang, Lili & Zhao, Peng, 2013. "Industrial CO2 emissions in China based on the hypothetical extraction method: Linkage analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1238-1244.

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