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A GMM test of the precautionary saving hypothesis with nonexpected-utility preferences

  • Myung Hoon Yi
  • Changkyu Choi

Using GMM estimation with the US data from January 1967 to April 2003, the precautionary saving hypothesis is tested using time-varying consumption uncertainty and a nonexpected-utility model of intertemporal optimal consumption. Overidentifying restrictions of the model specification are also tested for both expected and nonexpected utility using Hansen's J-statistics. It was found that the precautionary saving hypothesis did not hold under expected-utility preferences but did hold partly under nonexpected-utility preferences.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2006)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 71-78

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:38:y:2006:i:1:p:71-78
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  1. Alessandra Guariglia, 2002. "Consumption, habit formation, and precautionary saving: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(1), pages 1-19, January.
  2. Kuehlwein, Michael, 1991. "A test for the presence of precautionary saving," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 471-475, December.
  3. Alessandra Guariglia & Mariachristina Rossi, 1999. "Consumption, habit formation and precautionary saving: Evidence from the UK," Economics Discussion Papers 502, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  4. Steigerwald, Doug, 1997. "Consumption Adjustment under Changing Income Uncertainty," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt5kp8k6xc, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
  5. Jorion, Philippe & Giovannini, Alberto, 1993. "Time-series tests of a non-expected-utility model of asset pricing," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1083-1100, June.
  6. Engle, Robert F, 1982. "Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity with Estimates of the Variance of United Kingdom Inflation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 987-1007, July.
  7. Lyhagen, Johan, 1997. "The Effect of Precautionary Saving on Consumption in Sweden," Working Paper 58, National Institute of Economic Research.
  8. Merrigan, Philip & Normandin, Michel, 1996. "Precautionary Saving Motives: An Assessment from UK Time Series of Cross-Sections," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1193-1208, September.
  9. Hansen, Lars Peter, 1982. "Large Sample Properties of Generalized Method of Moments Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 1029-54, July.
  10. Johan Lyhagen, 2001. "The effect of precautionary saving on consumption in Sweden," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(5), pages 673-681.
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