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Consumption Adjustment under Changing Income Uncertainty

Author

Listed:
  • Hahm, J.-H.
  • Steigerwald, D.G.

Abstract

We study the effect of income uncertainty on consumption in a model that includes precautionary saving. In contrast to previous studies, we focus on time-series variation in income uncertainty. Our time-series measure of income uncertainty is constructed from a panel of forecasts. We find evidence of precautionary saving in that increases in income uncertainty are related to increases in aggregate rates of savings.

Suggested Citation

  • Hahm, J.-H. & Steigerwald, D.G., 1998. "Consumption Adjustment under Changing Income Uncertainty," Papers 345, Australian National University - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:aunaec:345
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Post & Katja Hanewald, 2010. "Stochastic Mortality, Subjective Survival Expectations, and Individual Saving Behavior," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2010-040, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    2. Myung Hoon Yi & Changkyu Choi, 2006. "A GMM test of the precautionary saving hypothesis with nonexpected-utility preferences," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 71-78.
    3. Shulian Zhang, 2005. "Consumption Behaviour Under Institutional Transitions in China," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 189, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    4. Mario Menegatti, 2007. "Consumption and uncertainty: a panel analysis in Italian Regions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 39-42.
    5. Saito, Makoto & Shiratsuka, Shigenori, 2003. "Precautionary Motives versus Waiting Options: Evidence from Aggregate Household Saving in Japan," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 21(3), pages 1-20, October.
    6. Balázs Romhányi, 2005. "A learning hypothesis of the term structure of interest rates," Macroeconomics 0503001, EconWPA.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    INCOME ; UNCERTAINTY ; CONSUMPTION;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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