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Survey measures of risk aversion and prudence

  • Joseph Eisenhauer
  • Luigi Ventura

This paper utilizes a thought experiment conducted by the Bank of Italy to estimate absolute and relative risk aversion along with absolute and relative prudence for a broad cross-section of Italian households. Upper and lower bounds are calculated for each parameter, and comparisons are made across socio-demographic groups. Evidence is found of decreasing absolute risk aversion, decreasing absolute prudence, increasing relative risk aversion, and increasing relative prudence.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 35 (2003)
Issue (Month): 13 ()
Pages: 1477-1484

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:35:y:2003:i:13:p:1477-1484
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  1. Miles S. Kimball, 1989. "Precautionary Saving in the Small and in the Large," NBER Working Papers 2848, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Luigi Guiso & Monica Paiella, 2007. "Risk Aversion, Wealth, and Background Risk," Economics Working Papers ECO2007/47, European University Institute.
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  4. Lusardi, Annamaria, 1997. "Precautionary saving and subjective earnings variance," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 319-326, December.
  5. Giuseppe Grande & Luigi Ventura, 2001. "Labor Income and Risky Assets under Market Incompleteness: Evidence from Italian Data," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 399, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  6. Dynan, Karen E, 1993. "How Prudent Are Consumers?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(6), pages 1104-13, December.
  7. Guiso, Luigi & Jappelli, Tullio & Terlizzese, Daniele, 1992. "Earnings Uncertainty and Precautionary Saving," CEPR Discussion Papers 699, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Blake, David, 1996. "Efficiency, Risk Aversion and Portfolio Insurance: An Analysis of Financial Asset Portfolios Held by Investors in the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1175-92, September.
  9. R. Mehra & E. Prescott, 2010. "The equity premium: a puzzle," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1401, David K. Levine.
  10. Sydney Ludvigson & Christina H. Paxson, 2001. "Approximation Bias In Linearized Euler Equations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 242-256, May.
  11. Skinner, Jonathan, 1988. "Risky income, life cycle consumption, and precautionary savings," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 237-255, September.
  12. Robert B. Barsky & Miles S. Kimball & F. Thomas Juster & Matthew D. Shapiro, 1995. "Preference Parameters and Behavioral Heterogeneity: An Experimental Approach in the Health and Retirement Survey," NBER Working Papers 5213, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Jonathan A. Parker, 1999. "The Reaction of Household Consumption to Predictable Changes in Social Security Taxes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 959-973, September.
  14. N. Gregory Mankiw & Stephen P. Zeldes, 1990. "The Consumption of Stockholders and Non-Stockholders," NBER Working Papers 3402, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Karen E. Dynan, 1993. "How prudent are consumers?," Working Paper Series / Economic Activity Section 135, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  16. Kuehlwein, Michael, 1991. "A test for the presence of precautionary saving," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 471-475, December.
  17. Adam J. Grossberg, 1991. "Personal Saving under Income Uncertainty: A Test of the Intertemporal Substitution Hypothesis," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 17(2), pages 203-210, Apr-Jun.
  18. Joseph G. Eisenhauer, 2000. "Estimating Prudence," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 26(4), pages 379-392, Fall.
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