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A self-reflective inverse demand system

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  • Kenneth W. Clements
  • Maxwell Maesepp

Abstract

This article introduces an inverse differential demand system that has exactly the same form as the corresponding direct version. Its application is illustrated with the case of Australian fruit, whose prices were substantially affected by Severe Tropical Cyclone Larry in 2006.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth W. Clements & Maxwell Maesepp, 2011. "A self-reflective inverse demand system," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(18), pages 1739-1743, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:18:y:2011:i:18:p:1739-1743 DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2011.562153
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