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Decentralization and health care expenditure: the Spanish case


  • David Cantarero


This study analyses the evolution of health care expenditure in Spain. A panel data model is used to explain the main factors which affect health care expenditure in the period 1993-1999. The empirical results show that the most important determinant in the explanation of the regional health care expenditure is ageing population while other factors such as income differences and structural characteristics of the supply variables have less importance.

Suggested Citation

  • David Cantarero, 2005. "Decentralization and health care expenditure: the Spanish case," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(15), pages 963-966.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:12:y:2005:i:15:p:963-966 DOI: 10.1080/13504850500377926

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hitiris, Theo & Posnett, John, 1992. "The determinants and effects of health expenditure in developed countries," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 173-181, August.
    2. Margherita Giannoni & Theodore Hitiris, "undated". "The Regional Impact of Health Care Expenditure: the Case of Italy," Discussion Papers 99/20, Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Blomqvist, A. G. & Carter, R. A. L., 1997. "Is health care really a luxury?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 207-229, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Masayoshi Hayashi & Akiko Oyama, "undated". "Factor decomposition of inter-prefectural health care expenditure disparities in Japan," Discussion papers ron264, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan.
    2. Giardina, Emilio & Cavalieri, Marina & Guccio, Calogero & Mazza, Isidoro, 2009. "Federalism, Party Competition and Budget Outcome: Empirical Findings on Regional Health Expenditure in Italy," MPRA Paper 16437, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Yihua Yu & Li Zhang & Fanghua Li & Xinye Zheng, 2013. "Strategic interaction and the determinants of public health expenditures in China: a spatial panel perspective," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(1), pages 203-221, February.
    4. Masayoshi Hayashi, 2011. "The effects of medical factors on transfer deficits in Public Assistance in Japan: a quantile regression analysis," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 287-307, December.
    5. Joan Costa-Font & Marin Gemmill & Gloria Rubert, 2008. "Re-visiting the Health Care Luxury Good Hypothesis: Aggregation, Precision, and Publication Biases?," Working Papers in Economics 197, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    6. David Prieto & Santiago Lago-Peñas, 2012. "Decomposing the determinants of health care expenditure: the case of Spain," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(1), pages 19-27, February.
    7. Vandersteegen, Tom & Marneffe, Wim & Cleemput, Irina & Vereeck, Lode, 2015. "The impact of no-fault compensation on health care expenditures: An empirical study of OECD countries," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(3), pages 367-374.

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