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Gender disparities in the field of economics

Author

Listed:
  • Junwan Liu

    (Beijing University of Technology)

  • Yinglu Song

    (Beijing University of Technology)

  • Sai Yang

    (Beijing University of Technology)

Abstract

In order to analyse the gender disparities in scientific research output in the field of economics, this paper selected the Web of Science database as the source database. We collected and screened 257,642 articles written by 130,397 authors from 1933 to 2017 in the field of economics. In this study, we use mathematical statistics and bibliometrics indexes to quantitatively analyse the gap between male and female authors in many aspects, including the output and influence in different level of journals and institutions, the dynamic evolution of output and influence and collaboration modes with gender disparities. In addition, we have analyzed the disparities in output and influence of male and female authors among different countries. The results show that male authors dominate in the economics research field according to their high output and influence. However, female authors also show advantage when it comes to the research influence. Finally, we conducted a dynamic analysis of the contribution and collaboration of men and women over the course of their careers, and our findings again demonstrate the importance of women’s participation in scientific collaboration. This study can provide an insight of gender different in economics research.

Suggested Citation

  • Junwan Liu & Yinglu Song & Sai Yang, 2020. "Gender disparities in the field of economics," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 125(2), pages 1477-1498, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:scient:v:125:y:2020:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-020-03627-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s11192-020-03627-x
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    Cited by:

    1. Ho Fai Chan & Benno Torgler, 2020. "Gender differences in performance of top cited scientists by field and country," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 125(3), pages 2421-2447, December.

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