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Are there gender differences among researchers from industrial/organizational psychology?

Author

Listed:
  • Cornelius J. König

    (Universität des Saarlandes)

  • Clemens B. Fell

    (Universität des Saarlandes)

  • Linus Kellnhofer

    (Universität des Saarlandes
    ONE Agency)

  • Gabriel Schui

    (Leibniz-Zentrum für Psychologische Information und Dokumentation (ZPID))

Abstract

Questions about gender differences in the workplace usually attract much attention—but often generate more heat than light. To examine gender differences in several facets of scientific productivity and impact, a quantitative, scientometric approach is employed. Analyzing a sample of industrial and organizational psychologists (N authors = 4234; N publications = 46,656), this study raises both questions and concerns about gender differences in research, by showing that female and male I–O psychologists differ with regard to publication output (fewer publications authored by female researchers), impact (heterogeneous, indicator-dependent gender differences), their publication career courses (male researchers’ periods of active publishing last longer and show longer interruptions), and research interests (only marginal gender differences). In order to get a glimpse of future developments, we repeated all analyses with the student subsample and found nearly no gender differences, suggesting a more gender-balanced future. Thus, this study gives an overview over the status quo of gender differences in an entire psychological sub-discipline. Future research will have to examine whether these gender differences are volitional in nature or the manifestation of external constraints.

Suggested Citation

  • Cornelius J. König & Clemens B. Fell & Linus Kellnhofer & Gabriel Schui, 2015. "Are there gender differences among researchers from industrial/organizational psychology?," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 105(3), pages 1931-1952, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:scient:v:105:y:2015:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-015-1646-y
    DOI: 10.1007/s11192-015-1646-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Mengya & Zhang, Gupeng & Liu, Yun & Zhai, Xiaorong & Han, Xinying, 2020. "Scientists’ genders and international academic collaboration: An empirical study of Chinese universities and research institutes," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4).
    2. Loarne-Lemaire, Séverine Le & Bertrand, Gaël & Razgallah, Meriam & Maalaoui, Adnane & Kallmuenzer, Andreas, 2021. "Women in innovation processes as a solution to climate change: A systematic literature review and an agenda for future research," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 164(C).
    3. Aleksandra Cislak & Magdalena Formanowicz & Tamar Saguy, 2018. "Bias against research on gender bias," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 115(1), pages 189-200, April.
    4. Martha M Bakker & Maarten H Jacobs, 2016. "Tenure Track Policy Increases Representation of Women in Senior Academic Positions, but Is Insufficient to Achieve Gender Balance," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(9), pages 1-15, September.
    5. Nida ul Habib Bajwa & Cornelius J. König, 2019. "How much is research in the top journals of industrial/organizational psychology dominated by authors from the U.S.?," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 120(3), pages 1147-1161, September.
    6. Sabrina J. Mayer & Justus M. K. Rathmann, 2018. "How does research productivity relate to gender? Analyzing gender differences for multiple publication dimensions," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 117(3), pages 1663-1693, December.
    7. Therese Söderlund & Guy Madison, 2015. "Characteristics of gender studies publications: a bibliometric analysis based on a Swedish population database," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 105(3), pages 1347-1387, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender differences; Research productivity; Scientific productivity; Impact; Psychology;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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