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A qualitative input-output method to find basic economic structures


  • Fidel Aroche-Reyes



Structural analysis deals with economic systems as defined by the set of industries and the relationships between them. However, multi-sectoral models are often limited: when studying economic systems empirically it is difficult to distinguish a priori the subset of basic or important relationships between industries. This research note presents a method to find the core of a productive structure by employing the qualitative approach and avoiding exogenous criteria. Results are presented in a graph of relationships that characterise the productive structure as a whole. In effect, the figure provides information concerning the main paths of influence between sectors in the structure, as well as information regarding the complexity of the economic system. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Fidel Aroche-Reyes, 2003. "A qualitative input-output method to find basic economic structures," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 82(4), pages 581-590, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:presci:v:82:y:2003:i:4:p:581-590 DOI: 10.1007/s10110-003-0149-z

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Liis LILL, "undated". "Assessing Economic Complexity in some OECD countries with Input-Output Based Measures," EcoMod2008 23800082, EcoMod.
    2. Araújo, Tanya & Faustino, Rui, 2017. "The topology of inter-industry relations from the Portuguese national accounts," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 479(C), pages 236-248.
    3. Llop, Maria & Ponce-Alifonso, Xavier, 2015. "Identifying the role of final consumption in structural path analysis: An application to water uses," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 203-210.
    4. Stanislav Edward Shmelev (ODID), "undated". "Environmentally Extended Input-Output Analysis of the UK Economy: Key Sector Analysis," QEH Working Papers qehwps183, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    5. Titze, Mirko & Brachert, Matthias & Kubis, Alexander, 2010. "The Identification of Industrial Clusters – Methodical Aspects in a Multidimensional Framework for Cluster Identification," IWH Discussion Papers 14/2010, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    6. McNerney, James & Fath, Brian D. & Silverberg, Gerald, 2013. "Network structure of inter-industry flows," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 392(24), pages 6427-6441.
    7. Tanya Ara'ujo & Rui Faustino, 2016. "The Topology of Inter-industry Relations from the Portuguese National Accounts," Papers 1612.06291,
    8. Mirko Titze & Matthias Brachert & Alexander Kubis, 2011. "Local and regional knowledge sources of industrial clusters - methodical aspects in a multidimensional framework for cluster identification," ERSA conference papers ersa10p709, European Regional Science Association.
    9. Kraftova Ivana & Chladek Tomas & Minarik Jakub, 2011. "Do Globalisation and Economic Cycles Reduce the Sector Inequality of Supra-Regions?," European Spatial Research and Policy, De Gruyter Open, vol. 18(2), pages 111-127, November.
    10. João Lopes, 2011. "Industrial Clustering and Sectoral Growth: a Network Dynamics Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa11p637, European Regional Science Association.
    11. García Muñiz, Ana Salomé, 2013. "Input–output research in structural equivalence: Extracting paths and similarities," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 796-803.


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