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articles: Voting with your feet in the United Kingdom: Using cross-migration rates to estimate relative living standards

Author

Listed:
  • Howard J. Wall

    () (Research Division, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, P.O. Box 442, St Louis, MO 63166-0442, USA)

Abstract

This article reexamines and extends the literature on the use of migration rates to estimate compensating differentials as measures of regional quality of life. I estimate an interregional migration regression for the UK and use the results to measure regional quality of life and standard of living. The results suggest a North-South divide within England, and that Scotland and Wales have relatively high levels of both. The results also lead to a rejection of regional standard-of-living e quivalence (long-run regional equilibrium) in the UK.

Suggested Citation

  • Howard J. Wall, 2001. "articles: Voting with your feet in the United Kingdom: Using cross-migration rates to estimate relative living standards," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 80(1), pages 1-23.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:presci:v:80:y:2001:i:1:p:1-23
    Note: Received: August 1998
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Nowotny, 2011. "Welfare Magnets, Taxation and the Location Decisions of Migrants to the EU," WIFO Working Papers 393, WIFO.
    2. Celia Melguizo & Vicente Royuela, 2017. "What drives migration moves across urban areas in Spain? Evidence from the Great Recession," Working Papers XREAP2017-03, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Oct 2017.
    3. Maribel Mojica & Tesfa Gebremedhin & Peter Schaeffer, 2008. "Valuing Community Attributes in Rural Counties in West Virginia: An Application of Data Envelopment Analysis," Working Papers Working Paper 2008-03, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University.
    4. José Navarro-Azorín & Andrés Artal-Tur, 2015. "Foot Voting in Spain: What Do Internal Migrations Say About Quality of Life in the Spanish Municipalities?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 124(2), pages 501-515, November.
    5. Matthias Wrede, 2015. "Wages, Rents, Unemployment, And The Quality Of Life: A Consistent Theory-Based Measure," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 609-625, September.
    6. repec:elg:eechap:14395_22 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ernest Miguélez & Rosina Moreno, 2014. "What Attracts Knowledge Workers? The Role Of Space And Social Networks," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 33-60, January.
    8. Celia Melguizo Cháfe & Vicente Royuela, 2017. "“What drives migration moves across urban areas in Spain?. Evidence from the Great Recession”," AQR Working Papers 201709, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised Sep 2017.
    9. Enrico Ivaldi & Guido Bonatti & Riccardo Soliani, 2014. "Composite Index for Quality of Life in Italian Cities: An Application to URBES Indicators," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 4, pages 18-32, November.
    10. Cho, Cheol-Joo, 2017. "The displacement and attraction effects in interurban migration: An application of the input-output scheme to the case of large cities in Korea," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-49, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Interregional migration; standard of living; quality of life;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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