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Emerging Use of Early Health Technology Assessment in Medical Product Development: A Scoping Review of the Literature

Author

Listed:
  • Maarten J. IJzerman

    () (University of Twente
    Luxembourg Institute of Health)

  • Hendrik Koffijberg

    (University of Twente)

  • Elisabeth Fenwick

    (ICON plc.)

  • Murray Krahn

    (University of Toronto)

Abstract

Early health technology assessment is increasingly being used to support health economic evidence development during early stages of clinical research. Such early models can be used to inform research and development about the design and management of new medical technologies to mitigate the risks, perceived by industry and the public sector, associated with market access and reimbursement. Over the past 25 years it has been suggested that health economic evaluation in the early stages may benefit the development and diffusion of medical products. Early health technology assessment has been suggested in the context of iterative economic evaluation alongside phase I and II clinical research to inform clinical trial design, market access, and pricing. In addition, performing early health technology assessment was also proposed at an even earlier stage for managing technology portfolios. This scoping review suggests a generally accepted definition of early health technology assessment to be “all methods used to inform industry and other stakeholders about the potential value of new medical products in development, including methods to quantify and manage uncertainty”. The present review also aimed to identify recent published empirical studies employing an early-stage assessment of a medical product. With most included studies carried out to support a market launch, the dominant methodology was early health economic modeling. Further methodological development is required, in particular, by combining systems engineering and health economics to manage uncertainty in medical product portfolios.

Suggested Citation

  • Maarten J. IJzerman & Hendrik Koffijberg & Elisabeth Fenwick & Murray Krahn, 2017. "Emerging Use of Early Health Technology Assessment in Medical Product Development: A Scoping Review of the Literature," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 35(7), pages 727-740, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:pharme:v:35:y:2017:i:7:d:10.1007_s40273-017-0509-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s40273-017-0509-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wieke Haakma & Lotte Steuten & Laura Bojke & Maarten IJzerman, 2014. "Belief Elicitation to Populate Health Economic Models of Medical Diagnostic Devices in Development," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 327-334, June.
    2. Michael Drummond & Adrian Towse, 2014. "Orphan drugs policies: a suitable case for treatment," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(4), pages 335-340, May.
    3. Maarten Ijzerman & Lotte Steuten, 2011. "Early assessment of medical technologies to inform product development and market access," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 9(5), pages 331-347, September.
    4. Susanne Hartz & Jürgen John, 2007. "The contribution of economic evaluation to decision-making in early phases of product development: a methodological and empirical review," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-094, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    5. De Pinho Campos, Katia & Norman, Cameron D. & Jadad, Alejandro R., 2011. "Product development public–private partnerships for public health: A systematic review using qualitative data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(7), pages 986-994.
    6. Warren G. Linley & Dyfrig A. Hughes, 2013. "Societal Views On Nice, Cancer Drugs Fund And Value‐Based Pricing Criteria For Prioritising Medicines: A Cross‐Sectional Survey Of 4118 Adults In Great Britain," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(8), pages 948-964, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Dando & Maximilian Lebmeier, 2020. "A novel valuation model for medical intervention development based on progressive dynamic changes that integrates Health Technology Assessment outcomes with early-stage innovation and indication-speci," Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 1-28, December.
    2. Petra Marešová & Lukáš Peter & Jan Honegr & Lukáš Režný & Marek Penhaker & Martin Augustýnek & Hana Mohelská & Blanka Klímová & Kamil Kuča, 2020. "Complexity Stage Model of the Medical Device Development Based on Economic Evaluation—MedDee," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(5), pages 1-27, February.

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