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Jobs, skills and the extractive industries: a review and situation analysis

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  • Evelyn Dietsche

    (United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research)

Abstract

Host governments and communities commonly expect that the extractive industries provide jobs and contribute to skills development, especially in Sub-Saharan African countries where many young people join local labour markets in record numbers every year. This article reviews the literature and offers an empirically informed situation analysis on the demand and supply characteristics of the jobs and skills associated with the sector. Against this background, it discusses some challenges and implications for skills development interventions and offers some insights from the E4D/SOGA programme.

Suggested Citation

  • Evelyn Dietsche, 2020. "Jobs, skills and the extractive industries: a review and situation analysis," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 33(3), pages 359-373, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:minecn:v:33:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1007_s13563-020-00219-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s13563-020-00219-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Venables, Anthony J. & Maloney, William & Kokko, Ari & Bravo Ortega, Claudio & Lederman, Daniel & Rigobón, Roberto & De Gregorio, José & Czelusta, Jesse & Jayasuriya, Shamila A. & Blomström, Magnus & , 2011. "Natural Resources: Neither Curse nor Destiny," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 350, October.
    2. Gylfason, Thorvaldur, 2001. "Natural resources, education, and economic development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 847-859, May.
    3. Fox,Louise & Kaul,Upaasna, 2018. "The evidence is in : how should youth employment programs in low-income countries be designed ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8500, The World Bank.
    4. repec:idb:brikps:59538 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Daniel Lederman & William F. Maloney, 2007. "Natural Resources : Neither Curse nor Destiny," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7183, September.
      • Anthony J. Venables & William Maloney & Ari Kokko & Claudio Bravo Ortega & Daniel Lederman & Roberto Rigobón & José De Gregorio & Jesse Czelusta & Shamila A. Jayasuriya & Magnus Blomström & L. Colin X, 2007. "Natural Resources: Neither Curse nor Destiny," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 59538 edited by William Maloney & Daniel Lederman, February.
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