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A model on the escape from the Malthusian trap

  • Alexia Prskawetz

    (Institute for Econometrics, Operations Research and Systems Theory, Vienna University of Technology, Argentinierstrasse 8, A-1040 Vienna, Austria)

  • Gunter Steinmann

    (Department of Economics, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Grosse Steinstrasse 73, D-06108 Halle/Saale, Germany)

  • Gustav Feichtinger

    (Institute for Econometrics, Operations Research and Systems Theory, Vienna University of Technology, Argentinierstrasse 8, A-1040 Vienna, Austria)

We consider a demoeconomic model where output is produced using physical capital, human capital and technology as inputs. Human capital depends on the number of people and the level of education in the economy. The dynamics of labour, physical capital, education and technology are endogenously determined such as to reflect the interdependence between economic and demographic factors. The longrun path of the economy and in particular the possibility to escape the Malthusian trap crucially depend on technological progress, which provides for economy wide increasing returns to scale. The build up of technology is positively related to the stock of human capital. Our model predicts that positive population growth is sufficient to escape the Malthusian trap.

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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (1998)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 535-550

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:11:y:1998:i:4:p:535-550
Note: Received: 22 August 1996 / Accepted: 11 December 1997
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  1. Robert J. Barro, 1995. "Inflation and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5326, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, . "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 90-5a, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  3. Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1990. "Population Growth and Human Capital Investments: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S38-70, October.
  4. Komlos, John & Artzrouni, Marc, 1990. "Mathematical Investigations of the Escape from the Malthusian Trap," Munich Reprints in Economics 3427, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  5. Winegarden, C R & Wheeler, Mark, 1992. "The Role of Economic Growth in the Fertility Transition in Western Europe: Econometric Evidence," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 59(236), pages 421-35, November.
  6. Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1995. "Transfers, social safety nets and economic growth," Economics Working Papers 139, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  7. Homburg, Stefan, 1995. "Humankapital und endogenes Wachstum," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 339-366.
  8. Steinmann, Gunter & Komlos, John, 1988. "Population growth and economic development in the very long run: a simulation model of three revolutions," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 49-63, August.
  9. anonymous, 1995. "Does the bouncing ball lead to economic growth?," Regional Update, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Jul, pages 1-2, 4-6.
  10. Schneider, Johannes & Ziesemer, Thomas, 1994. "What's New and What's Old in New Growth Theory: Endogenous Technology, Microfoundation, and Growth Rate Predictions," MPRA Paper 56132, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Kremer, Michael, 1993. "Population Growth and Technological Change: One Million B.C. to 1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(3), pages 681-716, August.
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