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International transmission of stock price movements: Evidence from the U.S. and five Asian-Pacific markets

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  • Y. Liu
  • Ming-Shiun Pan
  • Joseph Shieh

Abstract

Using a vector autoregressive analysis, this paper examines the structure of international transmissions in daily returns for six national stock markets— the U.S., Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand. Our results generally indicate that (1) the degree of interdependence among national stock markets has increased substantially after the 1987 stock market crash, (2) the U.S. market plays a dominant role of influencing the Pacific-Basin markets, (3) Japan and Singapore together have a significant persistent impact on the other Asian markets, and (4) the markets in Taiwan and Thailand are not efficient in processing international news. Copyright Springer 1998

Suggested Citation

  • Y. Liu & Ming-Shiun Pan & Joseph Shieh, 1998. "International transmission of stock price movements: Evidence from the U.S. and five Asian-Pacific markets," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 22(1), pages 59-69, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jecfin:v:22:y:1998:i:1:p:59-69
    DOI: 10.1007/BF02823233
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chung, Pin J. & Liu, Donald J., 1994. "Common stochastic trends in pacific rim stock markets," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 241-259.
    2. Hilliard, Jimmy E, 1979. "The Relationship between Equity Indices on World Exchanges," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 34(1), pages 103-114, March.
    3. A. G. Malliaris & Jorge L. Urrutia, 2005. "The International Crash of October 1987: Causality Tests," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Economic Uncertainty, Instabilities And Asset Bubbles Selected Essays, chapter 16, pages 251-262 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    Cited by:

    1. Huo, Rui & Ahmed, Abdullahi D., 2017. "Return and volatility spillovers effects: Evaluating the impact of Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 260-272.
    2. Jun Nagayasu, 2013. "Co-movements in real effective exchange rates: evidence from the dynamic hierarchical factor model," Working Papers 1318, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    3. Chiang, Thomas C. & Chen, Xiaoyu, 2016. "Stock returns and economic fundamentals in an emerging market: An empirical investigation of domestic and global market forces," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 107-120.
    4. Abraham, Abraham & Seyyed, Fazal J., 2006. "Information transmission between the Gulf equity markets of Saudi Arabia and Bahrain," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 276-285, September.
    5. Nagayasu, Jun, 2015. "Global and country-specific factors in real effective exchange rates," MPRA Paper 64217, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Saleem, Kashif, 2008. "International linkage of the Russian market and the Russian financial crisis : a multivariate GARCH analysis," BOFIT Discussion Papers 8/2008, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    7. Nagayasu, Jun, 2016. "Commonality and Heterogeneity in Real Effective Exchange Rates: Evidence from Advanced and Developing Countries," MPRA Paper 70078, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Bahng, Joshua Seungwook & Shin, Seung-myo, 2003. "Do stock price indices respond asymmetrically?: Evidence from China, Japan, and South Korea," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 541-563, August.
    9. Chen, Cathy W.S. & Yang, Ming Jing & Gerlach, Richard & Jim Lo, H., 2006. "The asymmetric reactions of mean and volatility of stock returns to domestic and international information based on a four-regime double-threshold GARCH model," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 366(C), pages 401-418.
    10. Giorgio Canarella & Stephen M. Miller & Stephen K. Pollard, 2008. "Dynamic Stock Market Interactions between the Canadian, Mexican, and the United States Markets: The NAFTA Experience," Working papers 2008-49, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    11. Sowmya Dhanaraj & Arun Kumar Gopalaswamy & M. Suresh Babu, 2017. "Trade, Financial Flows and Stock Market Interdependence: Evidence from Asian Markets," Working Papers 2017-158, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
    12. Chen, Xiaoyu & Chiang, Thomas C., 2016. "Stock returns and economic forces—An empirical investigation of Chinese markets," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 45-65.
    13. Nagayasu, Jun, 2010. "Economic Factors Contributing to Time-Varying Conditional Correlations in Stock Returns," MPRA Paper 28391, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. P., Srinivasan & M., Kalaivani, 2013. "Stock Market Linkages in Emerging Asia-Pacific Markets," MPRA Paper 45871, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Ozer-Imer, Itir & Ozkan, Ibrahim, 2014. "An empirical analysis of currency volatilities during the recent global financial crisis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 394-406.
    16. Valadkhani, Abbas & Chancharat, Surachai & Harvie, Charles, 2006. "The Interplay Between the Thai and Several Other International Stock Markets," Economics Working Papers wp06-18, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    17. Jayasuriya, Shamila A., 2011. "Stock market correlations between China and its emerging market neighbors," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 418-431.

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