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Test–retest reliability of the scale of participation in organized activities among adolescents in the Czech Republic and Slovakia

Author

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  • Lucia Bosakova

    (P. J. Safarik University in Kosice
    University of Economics in Bratislava
    Palacky University in Olomouc)

  • Peter Kolarcik

    (P. J. Safarik University in Kosice
    Palacky University in Olomouc)

  • Daniela Bobakova

    (P. J. Safarik University in Kosice
    Palacky University in Olomouc)

  • Martina Sulcova

    (Palacky University in Olomouc)

  • Jitse P. Dijk

    (P. J. Safarik University in Kosice
    University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen)

  • Sijmen A. Reijneveld

    (University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen)

  • Andrea Madarasova Geckova

    (P. J. Safarik University in Kosice
    Palacky University in Olomouc)

Abstract

Objectives Participation in organized activities is related with a range of positive outcomes, but the way such participation is measured has not been scrutinized. Test–retest reliability as an important indicator of a scale’s reliability has been assessed rarely and for “The scale of participation in organized activities” lacks completely. This test–retest study is based on the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study and is consistent with its methodology. Methods We obtained data from 353 Czech (51.9 % boys) and 227 Slovak (52.9 % boys) primary school pupils, grades five and nine, who participated in this study in 2013. We used Cohen’s kappa statistic and single measures of the intraclass correlation coefficient to estimate the test–retest reliability of all selected items in the sample, stratified by gender, age and country. Results We mostly observed a large correlation between the test and retest in all of the examined variables (κ ranged from 0.46 to 0.68). Test–retest reliability of the sum score of individual items showed substantial agreement (ICC = 0.64). Conclusions The scale of participation in organized activities has an acceptable level of agreement, indicating good reliability.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucia Bosakova & Peter Kolarcik & Daniela Bobakova & Martina Sulcova & Jitse P. Dijk & Sijmen A. Reijneveld & Andrea Madarasova Geckova, 2016. "Test–retest reliability of the scale of participation in organized activities among adolescents in the Czech Republic and Slovakia," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(3), pages 329-336, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:61:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s00038-015-0749-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-015-0749-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniela Bobakova & Zdenek Hamrik & Petr Badura & Dagmar Sigmundova & Hania Nalecz & Michal Kalman, 2015. "Test–retest reliability of selected physical activity and sedentary behaviour HBSC items in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Poland," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(1), pages 59-67, January.
    2. Chris Roberts & J. Freeman & O. Samdal & C. Schnohr & M. Looze & S. Nic Gabhainn & R. Iannotti & M. Rasmussen, 2009. "The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study: methodological developments and current tensions," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 54(2), pages 140-150, September.
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    1. Petr Badura & Dagmar Sigmundova & Erik Sigmund & Andrea Madarasova Geckova & Jitse P. Dijk & Sijmen A. Reijneveld, 2017. "Participation in organized leisure-time activities and risk behaviors in Czech adolescents," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 62(3), pages 387-396, April.

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