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Parenthood and Well-Being: The Moderating Role of Leisure and Paid Work

Author

Listed:
  • Anne Roeters

    () (Utrecht University
    Netherlands Institute of Social Research)

  • Jornt J. Mandemakers

    (Wageningen University)

  • Marieke Voorpostel

    (Swiss Centre of Expertise in the Social Sciences (FORS))

Abstract

Abstract This study contributes to our knowledge on the association between parenthood and psychological well-being by examining whether pre-parenthood lifestyles (leisure and paid work) moderate the transition to parenthood. We expected that people with less active lifestyles would find it easier to adapt to the demands of parenthood. Using eleven waves of the Swiss Household Panel (N = 1332 men and 1272 women; 1999–2008, 2010), fixed effects models are estimated for men and women separately. Results show that—on average—parenthood was not associated with well-being for men, whereas it increased well-being for women. As expected, the well-being premium/cost to parenthood was contingent upon individuals’ lifestyle before the transition to parenthood. For men, parenthood reduced well-being, but only if they frequently participated in leisure before the birth of the child. For women, motherhood had a beneficial effect on well-being but this effect was weaker for women who combined leisure with working long hours before motherhood.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Roeters & Jornt J. Mandemakers & Marieke Voorpostel, 2016. "Parenthood and Well-Being: The Moderating Role of Leisure and Paid Work," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(3), pages 381-401, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eurpop:v:32:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s10680-016-9391-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s10680-016-9391-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nicola Barban, 2011. "Family trajectories and health: A life course perspective," Working Papers 039, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
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    7. Gershuny, Jonathan, 2000. "Changing Times: Work and Leisure in Postindustrial Society," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287872.
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    1. repec:dem:demres:v:41:y:2019:i:5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:dem:demres:v:40:y:2019:i:31 is not listed on IDEAS

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