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The excess economic burden of mental disorders: findings from a cross-sectional prevalence survey in Austria

Author

Listed:
  • Agata Łaszewska

    (Medical University of Vienna)

  • Johannes Wancata

    (Medical University of Vienna)

  • Rebecca Jahn

    (Medical University of Vienna)

  • Judit Simon

    (Medical University of Vienna)

Abstract

Information about the scope of mental disorders (MDs), resource use patterns in health and social care sectors and economic cost is crucial for adequate mental healthcare planning. This study provides the first representative estimates about the overall utilisation of resources by people with MDs and the excess healthcare and productivity loss costs associated with MDs in Austria. Data were collected in a cross-sectional survey conducted on a representative sample (n = 1008) between June 2015 and June 2016. Information on mental health diagnoses, 12-month health and social care use, medication use, comorbidities, informal care, early retirement, sick leave and unemployment was collected via face-to-face interviews. Generalised linear model was used to assess the excess cost of MDs. The healthcare cost was 37% higher (p = 0.06) and the total cost was twice as high (p

Suggested Citation

  • Agata Łaszewska & Johannes Wancata & Rebecca Jahn & Judit Simon, 2020. "The excess economic burden of mental disorders: findings from a cross-sectional prevalence survey in Austria," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 21(7), pages 1075-1089, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:21:y:2020:i:7:d:10.1007_s10198-020-01200-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-020-01200-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 7th September 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-09-07 11:00:07

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    Cited by:

    1. David McDaid & A-La Park, 2022. "Understanding the Economic Value and Impacts on Informal Carers of People Living with Mental Health Conditions," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(5), pages 1-15, March.
    2. McDaid, David & Park, A-La, 2022. "Understanding the economic value and impacts on informal carers of people living with mental health conditions," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 114272, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mental disorders; Excess cost; Economic burden; Productivity loss;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health

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