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Government popularity and the economy: first evidence from German microdata

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  • Sören Enkelmann

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Abstract

This is one of the first studies to estimate a popularity function at the microlevel. Using German microlevel data for the years 1991, 1992, 1998, and 2008, we show that a positive assessment of the economy significantly improves government popularity, while negative evaluations decrease satisfaction with the government. Voters take the (current and expected) national and personal economic situation into account. We find no evidence for a grievance asymmetry, i.e., voters not only punish the government for a bad economy but also reward them in good times. Finally, we show that popularity functions are only very crude proxies for vote functions, with the latter being mostly driven by party identification. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Sören Enkelmann, 2014. "Government popularity and the economy: first evidence from German microdata," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 999-1017, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:46:y:2014:i:3:p:999-1017
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-013-0707-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:clp:wpaper:wp34 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Rodrigo Cerda & Natalia Gallardo & Rodrigo Vergara, 2017. "Political approval ratings and economic performance: evidence from Latin America," Estudios Públicos 23, Centro de Estudios Públicos.
    3. Gebhard Kirchgässner, 2016. "Voting and Popularity," CESifo Working Paper Series 6182, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Vote function; Popularity function; Microdata ; Germany; D72; H11;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government

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