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Heterogeneous Consequences of Teenage Childbearing

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  • Devon Gorry

    () (Clemson University)

Abstract

This study finds heterogeneous effects of teen childbearing on education and labor market outcomes across socioeconomic status and race. Using miscarriages to put bounds on the causal effects of teen childbearing, results show that teen childbearing leads to lower educational attainment, lower income, and greater use of welfare for individuals who come from counties with better socioeconomic conditions. However, there are no significant adverse effects for individuals who come from counties with worse socioeconomic conditions. Across race, teen childbearing leads to negative consequences for white teens but no significant negative effects for black or Hispanic and Latino teens.

Suggested Citation

  • Devon Gorry, 2019. "Heterogeneous Consequences of Teenage Childbearing," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(6), pages 2147-2168, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:56:y:2019:i:6:d:10.1007_s13524-019-00830-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-019-00830-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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