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Ready, Willing, and Able? Impediments to the Onset of Marital Fertility Decline in the United States

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  • J. David Hacker

    (University of Minnesota)

Abstract

This study relies on IPUMS samples of the 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 censuses, aggregate census data, and the timing of state laws criminalizing abortion to construct regional estimates of marital fertility in the United States and estimate correlates of marital fertility. The results show a significant lag between the onset of marital fertility decline in the nation’s northeastern census divisions and its onset in western and southern census divisions. Empirical models indicate the presence of cultural, economic, and legal impediments to the diffusion of marital fertility control and illustrate the need for more inclusive models of fertility decline.

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  • J. David Hacker, 2016. "Ready, Willing, and Able? Impediments to the Onset of Marital Fertility Decline in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(6), pages 1657-1692, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:53:y:2016:i:6:d:10.1007_s13524-016-0513-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-016-0513-7
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    3. Jesús J. Sánchez-Barricarte, 2018. "Measuring and explaining the baby boom in the developed world in the mid-twentieth century," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 38(40), pages 1189-1240.
    4. Hannaliis Jaadla & Alice Reid & Eilidh Garrett & Kevin Schürer & Joseph Day, 2020. "Revisiting the Fertility Transition in England and Wales: The Role of Social Class and Migration," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(4), pages 1543-1569, August.
    5. Hannaliis Jaadla & Alice Reid & Eilidh Garrett & Kevin Schürer & Joseph Day, 0. "Revisiting the Fertility Transition in England and Wales: The Role of Social Class and Migration," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 0, pages 1-27.

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