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The Scholarly Status of Blacks in the Economics Profession: Have the National Economic Association and the Review of Black Political Economy Mattered?

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  • Gregory Price

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  • Maxton Allen

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Abstract

This paper considers whether the National Economic Association and its journal the Review of Black Political Economy have enhanced the scholarly status of black economists. A bibliometric analysis reveals that while the typical black economist has never published in the Review of Black Political Economy, the share of black economists publishing in the Review of Black Economy approximates the share of all articles published on the economic and political economy of race by black economists, and the share of articles published in the Review of Black Political Economy by black economists appears higher than typical journals in economics—particularly for black economists employed at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. We also find that similar to other economics journals non-black economists dominate the share of published articles, and publications in the Review of Black Political Economy appear to be consistent with Lotka’s Law of scientific productivity suggesting that the journal is a standard outlet for research no different from any other science journal. Our results imply a plausible counterfactual that if the National Economic Association and Review of Black Political Economy did not exist, the scholarly status of blacks in the economics profession would have been lower than currently observed. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Price & Maxton Allen, 2014. "The Scholarly Status of Blacks in the Economics Profession: Have the National Economic Association and the Review of Black Political Economy Mattered?," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 1-11, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:blkpoe:v:41:y:2014:i:1:p:1-11
    DOI: 10.1007/s12114-012-9155-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mason, Patrick L. & Myers, Samuel Jr. & Darity, William Jr., 2005. "Is there racism in economic research?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 755-761, September.
    2. Stewart, James B., 2005. "Is there racism in economic research?: Research networks and discrimination research," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 790-794, September.
    3. Coleman, Major G., 2005. "Racism in academia: the white superiority supposition in the "unbiased" search for knowledge," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 762-774, September.
    4. James Peoples, 2009. "Minorities’ Fields of Expertise in Economics and Employment Demand in These Fields," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 1-6, March.
    5. Hodgson, Geoffrey M & Rothman, Harry, 1999. "The Editors and Authors of Economics Journals: A Case of Institutional Oligopoly?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 165-186, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gregory N. Price & Rhonda V. Sharpe, 2020. "Is the Economics Knowledge Production Function Constrained by Race in the USA?," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 11(2), pages 614-629, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Black economists; National economic association; Review of black political economy; A1; J1; Y1; Z13;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Y1 - Miscellaneous Categories - - Data: Tables and Charts
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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