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Economic Evaluations of Childhood Hearing Loss Screening Programmes: A Systematic Review and Critique

Author

Listed:
  • Rajan Sharma

    (Macquarie University Centre for the Health Economy)

  • Yuanyuan Gu

    (Macquarie University Centre for the Health Economy
    University of York)

  • Teresa Y. C. Ching

    (Australian Hearing Hub)

  • Vivienne Marnane

    (Australian Hearing Hub)

  • Bonny Parkinson

    (Macquarie University Centre for the Health Economy)

Abstract

Background Permanent childhood hearing loss is one of the most common birth conditions associated with speech and language delay. A hearing screening can result in early detection and intervention for hearing loss. Objectives To update and expand previous systematic reviews of economic evaluations of childhood hearing screening strategies, and explore the methodological differences. Data Sources MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane database, National Health Services Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database, and Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health’s (CADTH) Grey matters. Study Eligibility Criteria, Participants and Interventions Economic evaluations reporting costs and outcomes for both the intervention and comparator arms related to childhood hearing screening strategies. Results Thirty evaluations (from 29 articles) were included for review. Several methodological issues were identified, including: few evaluations reported outcomes in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs); none estimated utilities directly from surveying children; none included disutilities and costs associated with adverse events; few included costs and outcomes that differed by severity; few included long-term estimates; none considered acquired hearing loss; some did not present incremental results; and few conducted comprehensive univariate or probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Evaluations published post-2011 were more likely to report QALYs and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) as outcome measures, include long-term treatment and productivity costs, and present incremental results. Limitations We were unable to access the economic models and, although we employed an extensive search strategy, potentially not all relevant economic evaluations were identified. Conclusions and Implications Most economic evaluations concluded that childhood hearing screening is value for money. However, there were significant methodological limitations with the evaluations.

Suggested Citation

  • Rajan Sharma & Yuanyuan Gu & Teresa Y. C. Ching & Vivienne Marnane & Bonny Parkinson, 2019. "Economic Evaluations of Childhood Hearing Loss Screening Programmes: A Systematic Review and Critique," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 331-357, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:aphecp:v:17:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s40258-018-00456-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s40258-018-00456-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen Herrero Blanco & Juan D. Moreno Ternero, 2002. "Economic Evaluation Of Newborn Hearing Screening Procedures," Working Papers. Serie AD 2002-06, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    2. Rob Anderson, 2010. "Systematic reviews of economic evaluations: utility or futility?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 350-364, March.
    3. Ratcliffe, Julie & Huynh, Elisabeth & Chen, Gang & Stevens, Katherine & Swait, Joffre & Brazier, John & Sawyer, Michael & Roberts, Rachel & Flynn, Terry, 2016. "Valuing the Child Health Utility 9D: Using profile case best worst scaling methods to develop a new adolescent specific scoring algorithm," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 48-59.
    4. Briggs, Andrew & Sculpher, Mark & Claxton, Karl, 2006. "Decision Modelling for Health Economic Evaluation," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198526629, Decembrie.
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