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Uneven and unequal people-centered development: the case of Fair Trade and Malawi sugar producers

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  • David Phillips

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Abstract

This paper advances critical Fair Trade literature by exploring reasons for and lessons from uneven and unequal lived experiences of Fairtrade certification. Fieldwork was conducted in 2007 and 2008 to explore views and develop interpretations from various actors directly and indirectly participating in a Fairtrade certified sugar organization in Malawi. By exploring an embedded social and political context in a production place, and challenging assumptions and expectations of a Fair Trade community empowerment approach, research reveals intended and unintended consequences since certification. Findings propose lessons to adopt more nuanced understandings of place and context in Fair Trade approaches to facilitate more balanced community empowerment outcomes. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • David Phillips, 2014. "Uneven and unequal people-centered development: the case of Fair Trade and Malawi sugar producers," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 31(4), pages 563-576, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:31:y:2014:i:4:p:563-576
    DOI: 10.1007/s10460-014-9500-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:5:p:1551-:d:146146 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Fair Trade; Community; Empowerment; Sugar; Malawi;

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