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Food sovereignty in US food movements: radical visions and neoliberal constraints

  • Alison Alkon


  • Teresa Mares


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    Although the concept of food sovereignty is rooted in International Peasant Movements across the global south, activists have recently called for the adoption of this framework among low-income communities of color in the urban United States. This paper investigates on-the-ground processes through which food sovereignty articulates with the work of food justice and community food security activists in Oakland, California, and Seattle, Washington. In Oakland, we analyze a farmers market that seeks to connect black farmers to low-income consumers. In Seattle, we attend to the experiences of displaced immigrant farmers from Latin America and their efforts to address their food needs following migration. In both cases, we find that US based projects were constrained by broader forces of neoliberalism that remained unrecognized by local activists. In Oakland, despite a desire to create a local food system led by marginalized African Americans, emphasis on providing green jobs in agriculture led activists to take a market-based approach that kept local food out of the economic grasp of food-insecure neighborhood residents. In Seattle, the marginalization of the immense agroecological knowledge of Latino/an immigrant farmers rendered local food projects less inclusive and capable of transformative change. Taken together, these very different cases suggest that a shift towards food sovereignty necessitates a broad acknowledgement of and resistance to neoliberalism. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Agriculture and Human Values.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 347-359

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:29:y:2012:i:3:p:347-359
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    1. Walden Bello, 2008. "How to Manufacture a Global Food Crisis," Development, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 51(4), pages 450-455, December.
    2. Patricia Allen & Julie Guthman, 2006. "From “old school” to “farm-to-school”: Neoliberalization from the ground up," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 401-415, December.
    3. Peck, Jamie, 2012. "Constructions of Neoliberal Reason," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199662081.
    4. Michael Chappell & Liliana LaValle, 2011. "Food security and biodiversity: can we have both? An agroecological analysis," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 3-26, February.
    5. Peter Rosset, 2008. "Food Sovereignty and the Contemporary Food Crisis," Development, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 51(4), pages 460-463, December.
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