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Urban Growth: Trends Vs. Noise

  • Duranton, Gilles

This paper carries out a comparative analysis of the so-called classical urban growth models and ramdon urban growth models in order to explain their explanatory capabilities about urban growth and cities size distribution. The process of innovation through experimentation embedded in the classical urban growth models has shed new ligth to explain the coexistence of both diversified and specialized cities and role that diversified cities play as “nursery cities” by facilitating experimentation (Duranton and Puga, 2001). Classical urban growth models do not naturally generate the Zipf’s law (the rank-size rule for cities), whereas ramdon urban models provide a number of explanations for this key stylized fact. The theoretical foundations of both kind of models and their degree of compatibility are also examined. An exact statement of the conditions under which both type of models may be compatible is also needed.

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File URL: http://www.usc.es/econo/RGE/Vol19_ex/ingles/art1i.pdf
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Article provided by University of Santiago de Compostela. Faculty of Economics and Business. in its journal Revista Galega de Economía.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): ex ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:sdo:regaec:v:19:y:2010:i:ex_1
Contact details of provider: Postal: Avda Xoan XXIII S/N, 15704 Santiago de Compostela
Web page: http://www.usc.es/econo/RGE/benvidag.htm

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  1. Esteban Rossi-Hansberg & Mark L. J. Wright, 2007. "Urban Structure and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(2), pages 597-624.
  2. Guy Michaels & Ferdinand Rauch & Stephen J. Redding, 2012. "Urbanization and Structural Transformation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(2), pages 535-586.
  3. Federico Cingano & Fabiano Schivardi, 2004. "Identifying the Sources of Local Productivity Growth," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(4), pages 720-742, 06.
  4. Findeisen, Sebastian & Suedekum, Jens, 2007. "Industry Churning and the Evolution of Cities: Evidence for Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 3180, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Gabaix, Xavier & Ioannides, Yannis M., 2004. "The evolution of city size distributions," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 53, pages 2341-2378 Elsevier.
  6. Marcus Berliant & Ping Wang, 2004. "Dynamic Urban Models: Agglomeration and Growth," Urban/Regional 0404006, EconWPA.
  7. Xavier Gabaix, 1999. "Zipf'S Law For Cities: An Explanation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(3), pages 739-767, August.
  8. Xavier Gabaix, 1999. "Zipf's Law and the Growth of Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 129-132, May.
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