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Schooling, nation building and industrialization

Author

Listed:
  • Esther Hauk

    (Institut d’Anà lisi Econòmica (IAE-CSIC), Spain; Barcelona Graduate School of Economics, Spain)

  • Javier Ortega

    (Kingston University London, UK; CReAM, UK; IZA, Germany)

Abstract

We consider a Gellnerian model to study the transformation of a two-region state into a nation state. Industrialization requires the elites to finance schooling. The implementation of statewide education generates a common national identity, which enables cross-regional production, while regional education does not. We show that statewide education is chosen when cross-regional production opportunities and productivity are high, especially when the same elite holds power at both geographical levels. By contrast, a dominant regional elite might prefer regional schooling, even at the loss of large cross-regional production opportunities if it is statewide dominated. The model is consistent with evidence for five European countries in 1860–1920.

Suggested Citation

  • Esther Hauk & Javier Ortega, 2021. "Schooling, nation building and industrialization," Journal of Theoretical Politics, , vol. 33(1), pages 56-94, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:jothpo:v:33:y:2021:i:1:p:56-94
    DOI: 10.1177/0951629820963192
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    References listed on IDEAS

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