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Strikes as Collective Voice: A Behavioral Analysis of Strike Activity

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  • John Godard

Abstract

This paper outlines a “collective voice†approach for examining the behavioral determinants of variation in strike activity at the organizational level. The author argues that strikes should be viewed primarily as expressions of worker discontent rather than a result of imperfect or asymmetrical information. An analysis of survey data collected from 112 Canadian firms in 1980–81 indicates that managerial practices, operations size and technology, product market structure and conditions, union politics, and various other factors that influence the behavioral context of negotiations are significantly related to days lost due to strike activity. These findings are generally consistent with predictions from the collective voice approach.

Suggested Citation

  • John Godard, 1992. "Strikes as Collective Voice: A Behavioral Analysis of Strike Activity," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(1), pages 161-175, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:46:y:1992:i:1:p:161-175
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    Cited by:

    1. Filippo Belloc, 2019. "Labor Conflict at the Workplace: Do Dismissal Regulations Matter?," Department of Economics University of Siena 806, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    2. Mark Anner, 2018. "CSR Participation Committees, Wildcat Strikes and the Sourcing Squeeze in Global Supply Chains," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 56(1), pages 75-98, March.
    3. Ines Blohm & Sebastian Briel & Martina Pauly & Uta Heumann & Claudia Brülin, 2006. "Comparative Human Resource Management in the European Banking Sector: The Effect of Collective Bargaining Power on Working Conditions," LIS Working papers 450, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    4. Christa N. Brunnschweiler & Colin Jennings & Ian A. MacKenzie, 2012. "Rebellion against Reason? A Study of Expressive Choice and Strikes," Working Paper Series 13012, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    5. William H. Greene & Ana P. Martins, 2002. "Striking Features of the Labor Market," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2002/08, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    6. William H. Greene & Ana P. Martins, 2013. "Striking Features of the Labor Market: Theory," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 56(2), pages 1-24.
    7. Addison, John T. & Teixeira, Paulino, 2019. "Strikes, employee workplace representation, unionism, and industrial relations quality in European establishments," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 109-133.
    8. Constanţa POPESCU, & Elena Diana ŞERB, & Andreiana CARMEN, 2016. "Study On The Repercussions Of Conflict Situations On Employment," EcoForum, "Stefan cel Mare" University of Suceava, Romania, Faculty of Economics and Public Administration - Economy, Business Administration and Tourism Department., vol. 5(1), pages 1-38, January.
    9. William H. Greene & Ana P. Martins, 2013. "Striking Features of the Labor Market: Empirical Evidence," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 56(2), pages 25-53.
    10. Jeremy Tanguy, 2013. "Collective and Individual Conflicts in the Workplace: Evidence from F rance," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 102-133, January.

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