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Did suburbanization cause residential segregation? Evidence from U.S. metropolitan areas

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  • Boishampayan Chatterjee

    () (Institute of Management Technology, Ghaziabad, India)

Abstract

Population suburbanization has been long held as a cause for increasing racial residential segregation in US metropolitan areas. This paper hypothesizes that rapid suburbanization between 1960 and 2000 has caused an increase in racial residential segregation in U.S. metropolitan areas. Using the 1947 national interstate highway plan as an instrument for suburbanization and decennial Census data from 1960 to 2000, this paper finds that central city population decline (suburbanization) causes racial residential segregation in a metropolitan area to rise. Estimation results from both long difference and panel regressions are robust to an array of specifications. Had there been no suburbanization between 1960 and 2000, racial residential segregation on average would have declined by about 4 percentage points more than what is observed in the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Boishampayan Chatterjee, 2015. "Did suburbanization cause residential segregation? Evidence from U.S. metropolitan areas," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 9(1), pages 25-36, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:rse:wpaper:v:9:y:2015:i:1:p:25-36
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 1999. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 455-506, June.
    2. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    3. Peter Mieszkowski & Edwin S. Mills, 1993. "The Causes of Metropolitan Suburbanization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 135-147, Summer.
    4. Nathaniel Baum-Snow, 2007. "Did Highways Cause Suburbanization?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 775-805.
    5. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser, 1997. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 827-872.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Suburbanization; Residential Segregation; Highways; Metropolitan area;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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