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Productivity in civil justice in Portugal: A crucial issue in a congested system

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  • Lara Wemans
  • Manuel Coutinho Pereira

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  • Lara Wemans & Manuel Coutinho Pereira, 2017. "Productivity in civil justice in Portugal: A crucial issue in a congested system," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles and Banco de Portugal Economic Studies, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ptu:bdpart:e201701
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    File URL: https://www.bportugal.pt/sites/default/files/anexos/papers/ree201701_e.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lara Wemans & Manuel Coutinho Pereira, 2015. "Determinants of civil litigation in Portugal," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles and Banco de Portugal Economic Studies, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    2. Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina & Grajzl, Peter & Sustersic, Janez & Zajc, Katarina, 2012. "Court output, judicial staffing, and the demand for court services: Evidence from Slovenian courts of first instance," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 19-29.
    3. Stefan Voigt & Nora El-Bialy, 2016. "Identifying the determinants of aggregate judicial performance: taxpayers’ money well spent?," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 283-319, April.
    4. Sebastiaan Pompe & Wolfgang Bergthaler, 2015. "Reforming the Legal and Institutional Framework for the Enforcement of Civil and Commercial Claims in Portugal," IMF Working Papers 2015/279, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Kosma, Montgomery N, 1998. "Measuring the Influence of Supreme Court Justices," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(2), pages 333-372, June.
    6. Uschi Backes-Gellner & Martin R. Schneider & Stephan Veen, 2011. "Effect of Workforce Age on Quantitative and Qualitative Organizational Performance: Conceptual Framework and Case Study Evidence," Working Papers 0143, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
    7. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    8. Manuel Coutinho Pereira & Mário Centeno, 2005. "Wage determination in general government in Portugal," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles and Banco de Portugal Economic Studies, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    9. Beenstock, Michael & Haitovsky, Yoel, 2004. "Does the appointment of judges increase the output of the judiciary?," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 351-369, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lara Wemans & Manuel Coutinho Pereira, 2018. "How long does it take to enforce a debt in the Portuguese judicial system?," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles and Banco de Portugal Economic Studies, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

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