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Note bibliografiche: E se l'Italia tornasse alla lira? Vantaggi, costi e rischi†di Enrico Marelli, Marcello Signorelli

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  • Salvatore Perri

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Review of "E se l'Italia tornasse alla lira? Vantaggi, costi e rischi†di Enrico Marelli, Marcello Signorelli

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  • Salvatore Perri, 2018. "Note bibliografiche: E se l'Italia tornasse alla lira? Vantaggi, costi e rischi†di Enrico Marelli, Marcello Signorelli," Moneta e Credito, Economia civile, vol. 71(283), pages 265-270.
  • Handle: RePEc:psl:moneta:2018:36
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    File URL: https://ojs.uniroma1.it/index.php/monetaecredito/article/view/14309/pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blyth, Mark, 2013. "Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199828302.
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