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Investiční rozhodování firem v korupčním prostředí ve střední a východní Evropě
[Innovation Decisions in Uncertain Business Environments of CEE Countries]

Author

Listed:
  • Jan Hanousek
  • Anastasiya Shamshur
  • Jiří Trešl

Abstract

Corporate innovations are a central part of a country's economic activity. They foster and improve competitiveness, which ultimately leads to economic growth and progress. In this study, we focus on the post-communist European region, where corporations operate under uncertain conditions. Utilizing a sample with almost 100,000 firm level observations over the period from 2001 to 2013, we analyse effects of uncertainty steaming from corruption environment on innovation decisions of the Central European private firms. We find that domestic firms and firms with dispersed ownership innovate less when business and municipal uncertainty conditions increase. When firms are unsure whether they will be blocked by local bureaucrats from capitalizing on their innovation, they scale down their efforts. However, this result disappears for firms with foreign majority ownership. We hypothesize that foreign controlled firms have cleared all uncertainties before they entered the foreign market.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Hanousek & Anastasiya Shamshur & Jiří Trešl, 2018. "Investiční rozhodování firem v korupčním prostředí ve střední a východní Evropě [Innovation Decisions in Uncertain Business Environments of CEE Countries]," Politická ekonomie, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2018(3), pages 287-301.
  • Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpol:v:2018:y:2018:i:3:id:1189:p:287-301
    DOI: 10.18267/j.polek.1189
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Acemoglu, Daron & Johnson, Simon & Robinson, James A., 2005. "Institutions as a Fundamental Cause of Long-Run Growth," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 6, pages 385-472, Elsevier.
    2. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Vishny, Robert & Shleifer, Andrei, 1999. "The quality of government," Scholarly Articles 30747160, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    3. Philippe Aghion, 2005. "Growth and Institutions," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 3-18, March.
    4. Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), 2005. "Handbook of Economic Growth," Handbook of Economic Growth, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 1, number 1.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; firms; panel data; innovations; Europe;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C58 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Financial Econometrics
    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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