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Economic Impact of Maternal Death on Households in Rural China: A Prospective Cohort Study

Author

Listed:
  • Haijun Wang
  • Fang Ye
  • Yan Wang
  • Dale Huntington
  • the study group for Economic Impact of Maternal Deaths in China

Abstract

Objective: To assess the economic impact of maternal death on rural Chinese households during the year after maternal death. Methods: A prospective cohort study matched 183 households who had suffered a maternal death to 346 households that experienced childbirth without maternal death in rural areas of three provinces in China. Surveys were conducted at baseline (1–3 months after maternal death or childbirth) and one year after baseline using the quantitative questionnaire. We investigated household income, expenditure, accumulated debts, and self-reported household economic status. Difference-in-Difference (DID), linear regression, and logistic regression analyses were used to compare the economic status between households with and without maternal death. Findings: The households with maternal death had a higher risk of self-reported “household economy became worse” during the follow-up period (adjusted OR = 6.04, p

Suggested Citation

  • Haijun Wang & Fang Ye & Yan Wang & Dale Huntington & the study group for Economic Impact of Maternal Deaths in China, 2013. "Economic Impact of Maternal Death on Households in Rural China: A Prospective Cohort Study," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 8(10), pages 1-9, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:plo:pone00:0076624
    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0076624
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Storeng, Katerini Tagmatarchi & Baggaley, Rebecca F. & Ganaba, Rasmané & Ouattara, Fatoumata & Akoum, Mélanie S. & Filippi, Véronique, 2008. "Paying the price: The cost and consequences of emergency obstetric care in Burkina Faso," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 545-557, February.
    2. Frances R. Woolley & Judith Marshall, 1994. "Measuring Inequality Within The Household," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 40(4), pages 415-431, December.
    3. Xing Lin Feng & Guang Shi & Yan Wang & Ling Xu & Hao Luo & Juan Shen & Hui Yin & Yan Guo, 2010. "An impact evaluation of the Safe Motherhood Program in China," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(S1), pages 69-94, September.
    4. Woolley, Frances R & Marshall, Judith, 1994. "Measuring Inequality within the Household," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 40(4), pages 415-431, December.
    5. Fang Ye & Haijun Wang & Dale Huntington & Hong Zhou & Yan Li & Fengzhi You & Jinhua Li & Wenlong Cui & Meiling Yao & Yan Wang & the study team for Economic Impact of Maternal Deaths in China, 2012. "The Immediate Economic Impact of Maternal Deaths on Rural Chinese Households," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 7(6), pages 1-7, June.
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