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Healthy publics: enabling cultures and environments for health

Author

Listed:
  • Stephen Hinchliffe

    () (University of Exeter)

  • Mark A. Jackson

    (University of Exeter)

  • Katrina Wyatt

    (University of Exeter Medical School)

  • Anne E. Barlow

    (University of Exeter Law School)

  • Manuela Barreto

    (University of Exeter
    Lisbon University Institute (CIS/ISCTE-IUL))

  • Linda Clare

    (University of Exeter)

  • Michael H. Depledge

    (University of Exeter Medical School)

  • Robin Durie

    (University of Exeter)

  • Lora E. Fleming

    (University of Exeter Medical School)

  • Nick Groom

    (University of Exeter)

  • Karyn Morrissey

    (University of Exeter Medical School)

  • Laura Salisbury

    (University of Exeter)

  • Felicity Thomas

    (University of Exeter Medical School
    University of Exeter)

Abstract

Despite extraordinary advances in biomedicine and associated gains in human health and well-being, a growing number of health and well-being related challenges have remained or emerged in recent years. These challenges are often ‘more than biomedical’ in complexion, being social, cultural and environmental in terms of their key drivers and determinants, and underline the necessity of a concerted policy focus on generating healthy societies. Despite the apparent agreement on this diagnosis, the means to produce change are seldom clear, even when the turn to health and well-being requires sizable shifts in our understandings of public health and research practices. This paper sets out a platform from which research approaches, methods and translational pathways for enabling health and well-being can be built. The term ‘healthy publics’ allows us to shift the focus of public health away from ‘the public’ or individuals as targets for intervention, and away from the view that culture acts as a barrier to efficient biomedical intervention, towards a greater recognition of the public struggles that are involved in raising health issues, questioning what counts as healthy and unhealthy and assembling the evidence and experience to change practices and outcomes. Creating the conditions for health and well-being, we argue, requires an engaged research process in which public experiments in building and repairing social and material relations are staged and sustained even if, and especially when, the fates of those publics remain fragile and buffeted by competing and often more powerful public formations.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Hinchliffe & Mark A. Jackson & Katrina Wyatt & Anne E. Barlow & Manuela Barreto & Linda Clare & Michael H. Depledge & Robin Durie & Lora E. Fleming & Nick Groom & Karyn Morrissey & Laura Salis, 2018. "Healthy publics: enabling cultures and environments for health," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 4(1), pages 1-10, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:palcom:v:4:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1057_s41599-018-0113-9
    DOI: 10.1057/s41599-018-0113-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Todorova, Irina L.G. & Baban, Adriana & Balabanova, Dina & Panayotova, Yulia & Bradley, Janet, 2006. "Providers' constructions of the role of women in cervical cancer screening in Bulgaria and Romania," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 776-787, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vasiliki Kioupi & Nikolaos Voulvoulis, 2020. "Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): Assessing the Contribution of Higher Education Programmes," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(17), pages 1-17, August.
    2. Steve Hinchliffe & Andrea Butcher & Muhammad Meezanur Rahman, 2018. "The AMR problem: demanding economies, biological margins, and co-producing alternative strategies," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 4(1), pages 1-12, December.
    3. Melanie Rock & Gwendolyn Blue, 2020. "Healthy publics as multi-species matters: solidarity with people’s pets in One Health promotion," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 7(1), pages 1-8, December.
    4. Krithika Srinivasan & Tim Kurz & Pradeep Kuttuva & Chris Pearson, 2019. "Reorienting rabies research and practice: Lessons from India," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 5(1), pages 1-11, December.
    5. Jennifer Gabrys, 2020. "Planetary health in practice: sensing air pollution and transforming urban environments," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 7(1), pages 1-11, December.
    6. Henrice Altink, 2020. "Tackling child malnutrition in Jamaica, 1962–2020," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 7(1), pages 1-14, December.
    7. Christopher J. Colvin & Myrna Pinxteren & Mandla Majola & Natalie Leon & Alison Swartz & Nonzuzo Mbokazi & Mark Lurie, 2020. "Fostering a healthy public for men and HIV: a case study of the Movement for Change and Social Justice (MCSJ)," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 6(1), pages 1-8, December.
    8. David A. Camlin & Helena Daffern & Katherine Zeserson, 2020. "Group singing as a resource for the development of a healthy public: a study of adult group singing," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 7(1), pages 1-15, December.
    9. Wilson, Marisa & McLennan, Amy, 2019. "A comparative ethnography of nutrition interventions: Structural violence and the industrialisation of agrifood systems in the Caribbean and the Pacific," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 228(C), pages 172-180.

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