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Do Gender Targets and Gender Working Groups Contribute to More Gender-Sensitive Budget Support? Evidence from 14 Sub-Saharan African Countries

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  • Nathalie Holvoet

    () (University of Antwerp)

  • Liesbeth Inberg

    (University of Antwerp)

Abstract

Abstract Aiming to increase the gender-sensitivity of budget support, the inclusion of sex-disaggregated indicators in Performance Assessment Frameworks (PAFs) and the set up of joint gender (sector) working groups have been proposed as possible remedying incentives. This article explores whether and in which (aid and country) contexts these measures have contributed to increasing female enrolment in primary education, by studying a sample of 14 Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. The findings of our QCA-analysis demonstrate that particularly a combination of both types of incentives contributes to high performance in increasing female primary enrolment. Additionally, both types of measures prove to be especially effective in highly aid-dependent countries. If aid dependency is combined with a supportive country context, the presence of a gender working group seems to be sufficient; in a less enabling country, setting the inclusion of sex-disaggregated indicators in the PAF is necessary, although not sufficient.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathalie Holvoet & Liesbeth Inberg, 2016. "Do Gender Targets and Gender Working Groups Contribute to More Gender-Sensitive Budget Support? Evidence from 14 Sub-Saharan African Countries," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(5), pages 875-892, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:eurjdr:v:28:y:2016:i:5:d:10.1057_ejdr.2015.58
    DOI: 10.1057/ejdr.2015.58
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    References listed on IDEAS

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