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Multiple Pathways to Gender-Sensitive Budget Support in the Education Sector: Analysing the Effectiveness of Sex-Disaggregated Indicators in Performance Assessment Frameworks and Gender Working Groups in (Education) Budget Support to Sub-Saharan Africa Countries

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  • Holvoet, Nathalie
  • Inberg, Liesbeth

Abstract

In order to correct for the initial gender blindness of the Paris Declaration and related aid modalities as general and sector budget support, it has been proposed to integrate a gender dimension into budget support entry points. This paper studies the effectiveness of (joint) gender working groups and the integration of sex-disaggregated indicators and targets in performance assessment frameworks in the context of education sector budget support delivered to a sample of 17 Sub-Saharan African countries over the period 2005-10. Findings of the qualitative comparative analysis demonstrate that engendering these two budget support entry points contributed to high performance on increasing female enrolment.

Suggested Citation

  • Holvoet, Nathalie & Inberg, Liesbeth, 2013. "Multiple Pathways to Gender-Sensitive Budget Support in the Education Sector: Analysing the Effectiveness of Sex-Disaggregated Indicators in Performance Assessment Frameworks and Gender Working Groups," WIDER Working Paper Series 105, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2013-105
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/WP2013-105.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adam, Christopher S. & Gunning, Jan Willem, 2002. "Redesigning the Aid Contract: Donors' Use of Performance Indicators in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 2045-2056, December.
    2. Sedelmeier, Ulrich, 2009. "Post-accession compliance with EU gender equality legislation in post-communist new member states," European Integration online Papers (EIoP), European Community Studies Association Austria (ECSA-A), vol. 13, December.
    3. Renard, Robrecht & Molenaers, Nadia, 2008. "Policy dialogue under the new aid approach: which role for medium-sized donors? Theoretical reflections and views from the field," IOB Discussion Papers 2008.05, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy (IOB).
    4. Angela Hawken & Gerardo Munck, 2013. "Cross-National Indices with Gender-Differentiated Data: What Do They Measure? How Valid Are They?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 111(3), pages 801-838, May.
    5. David Booth, 2003. "Introduction and Overview," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 21(2), pages 131-159, March.
    6. Boris Branisa & Stephan Klasen & Maria Ziegler, 2009. "The Construction of the Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI)," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 184, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Nathalie Holvoet, 2010. "Gender Equality and New Aid Modalities: Is Love Really in the Air?*," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 22(1), pages 97-117, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Janet Gale Stotsky & Lisa L Kolovich & Suhaib Kebhaj, 2016. "Sub-Saharan Africa; A Survey of Gender Budgeting Efforts," IMF Working Papers 16/152, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Boris Branisa & Carolina Cardona, 2015. "Social Institutions and Gender Inequality in Fragile States: Are they relevant for the Post-MDG Debate?," Development Research Working Paper Series 06/2015, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.

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    Keywords

    Education; Women;

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