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Adaptive markets: financial evolution at the speed of thought by Andrew Lo

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  • Richard Berner

    (New York University Stern School of Business)

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  • Richard Berner, 2019. "Adaptive markets: financial evolution at the speed of thought by Andrew Lo," Business Economics, Palgrave Macmillan;National Association for Business Economics, vol. 54(1), pages 89-91, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:buseco:v:54:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1057_s11369-018-0101-5
    DOI: 10.1057/s11369-018-0101-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. George A. Akerlof, 2009. "How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1175-1175.
    2. Julian Kozlowski & Laura Veldkamp & Venky Venkateswaran, 2019. "The Tail That Keeps the Riskless Rate Low," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(1), pages 253-283.
    3. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    4. Fama, Eugene F, 1970. "Efficient Capital Markets: A Review of Theory and Empirical Work," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 25(2), pages 383-417, May.
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