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Do Analysts Herd? An Analysis of Recommendations and Market Reactions

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  • Narasimhan Jegadeesh
  • Woojin Kim

Abstract

This article develops and implements a new test to investigate whether sell-side analysts herd around the consensus when they make stock recommendations. Our empirical results support the herding hypothesis. Stock price reactions following recommendation revisions are stronger when the new recommendation is away from the consensus than when it is closer to it, indicating that the market recognizes analysts' tendency to herd. We find that analysts from larger brokerages, analysts following stocks with smaller dispersion across recommendations, and analysts who make less frequent revisions are more likely to herd. The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for Financial Studies. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Narasimhan Jegadeesh & Woojin Kim, 2010. "Do Analysts Herd? An Analysis of Recommendations and Market Reactions," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(2), pages 901-937, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:23:y:2010:i:2:p:901-937
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/rfs/hhp093
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sushil Bikhchandani & Sunil Sharma, 2001. "Herd Behavior in Financial Markets," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 47(3), pages 1-1.
    2. Scharfstein, David S & Stein, Jeremy C, 1990. "Herd Behavior and Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 465-479, June.
    3. Sorescu, Sorin & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 2006. "The Cross Section of Analyst Recommendations," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(1), pages 139-168, March.
    4. Narasimhan Jegadeesh & Joonghyuk Kim & Susan D. Krische & Charles M. C. Lee, 2004. "Analyzing the Analysts: When Do Recommendations Add Value?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(3), pages 1083-1124, June.
    5. Ivkovic, Zoran & Jegadeesh, Narasimhan, 2004. "The timing and value of forecast and recommendation revisions," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 433-463, September.
    6. Jaffe, Jeffrey F. & Mahoney, James M., 1999. "The performance of investment newsletters," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 289-307, August.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage

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