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Monetary Policy under EMU


  • Bean, Charles


This paper considers a number of issues connected with the implementation of monetary policy in the Euro zone. These include: the techniques of monetary control; whether to adopt an explicit inflation target and, if so, for what index; the politics of decision-making within the Governing Council of the European System of Central Banks; the likelihood of there being conflicts of interest between the member countries of the Euro zone; the interaction of monetary and fiscal policy; and the role of the ESCB in maintaining financial stability. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Bean, Charles, 1998. "Monetary Policy under EMU," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(3), pages 41-53, Autumn.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:14:y:1998:i:3:p:41-53

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2004. "Can Labor Regulation Hinder Economic Performance? Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 91-134.
    2. Kimberly Ann Elliott & Richard B. Freeman, 2003. "Can Labor Standards Improve under Globalization?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 338.
    3. Blanchflower, D. & Slaughter, M., 1998. "The Causes and Consequences of Changing Income Inequality: W(h)ither the Debate?," Papers 27, Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics.
    4. Glyn, A. & Hughes, A. & Lipietz, A. & Singh, A., 1988. "The Rise And Fall Of The Golden Age," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 884, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    5. Drusilla K. Brown & Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2001. "Child Labor: Theory, Evidence and Policy," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0111, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hein, Eckhard & Truger, Achim, 2002. "European Monetary Union: Nominal convergence, real divergence and slow growth? An investigation into the effects of changing macroeconomic policy institutions associated with monetary union," WSI Working Papers 107, The Institute of Economic and Social Research (WSI), Hans-Böckler-Foundation.
    2. Hein, Eckhard, 2001. "Institutions and macroeconomic performance: Central bank independence, labour market institutions and the perspectives for inflation and employment in the European Monetary Union," WSI Working Papers 95, The Institute of Economic and Social Research (WSI), Hans-Böckler-Foundation.
    3. Marco Buti & Martin Larch & Fabio Balboni, 2009. "Monetary and fiscal policy interactions in the EMU when cyclical conditions are uncertain," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 21-44, February.
    4. Marco Buti & Werner Rüger & Alessandro Turrini, 2009. "Is Lisbon Far from Maastricht? Trade-offs and Complementarities between Fiscal Discipline and Structural Reforms," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 55(1), pages 165-196, March.
    5. Eckhard Hein, 2002. "Monetary policy and wage bargaining in the EMU: restrictive ECB policies, high unemployment, nominal wage restraint and inflation above the target," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 55(222), pages 299-337.
    6. Morgan, Julian & Locarno, Alberto & Vallés, Javier & Berben, Robert-Paul, 2004. "Cross-country differences in monetary policy transmission," Working Paper Series 400, European Central Bank.
    7. Bergman, U. Michael & Hansen, Jan, 2002. "Financial Instability and Monetary Policy: The Swedish Evidence," Working Paper Series 137, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    8. Pawel Gajewski, 2014. "Monetary policy stress in EMU during the moderation and the global crisis," Lodz Economics Working Papers 2/2014, University of Lodz, Faculty of Economics and Sociology.
    9. Alessandro Girardi & Paolo Paesani, 2008. "Structural Reforms and Fiscal Discipline in Europe," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 15(2), pages 389-402, September.
    10. Fabio Balboni & Marco Buti & Martin Larch, 2007. "ECB vs Council vs Commission: Monetary and fiscal policy interactions in the EMU when cyclical conditions are uncertain," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 277, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    11. Benigno, Pierpaolo, 2004. "Optimal monetary policy in a currency area," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 293-320, July.
    12. Andrea Venegoni & Massimiliano Serati, 2017. "The Symmetry of ECB Monetary Policy Impact Under Scrutiny: An Assessment," LIUC Papers in Economics 306, Cattaneo University (LIUC).
    13. Gottfried Haber & Reinhard Neck & Warwick McKibbin, 2002. "Global Implications of Monetary and Fiscal Policy Rules in the EMU," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 363-379, October.
    14. Christopher Allsopp, 2002. "Macroeconomic Policy Rules in Theory and in Practice," Discussion Papers 10, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.

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