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Recent Trends in the UK Income Distribution: What Happened and Why?

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Listed:
  • Jenkins, Stephen P

Abstract

The UK income distribution changed its shape dramatically during the 1980s. This paper documents the trends and analyses their causes. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jenkins, Stephen P, 1996. "Recent Trends in the UK Income Distribution: What Happened and Why?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 29-46, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:12:y:1996:i:1:p:29-46
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Flachaire, Emmanuel & Nunez, Olivier, 2007. "Estimation of the income distribution and detection of subpopulations: An explanatory model," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 51(7), pages 3368-3380, April.
    2. Michel Fouquin & Sébastien Jean & Aude Sztulman, 2000. "Le marché du travail britannique vu de France," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 332(1), pages 97-115.
    3. Huesca, Luis, 2004. "¿Desaparece la clase media en México?: Una aplicación de la polarización por subgrupos entre 1984 y 2000
      [Is the middle class vanishing in Mexico?: An application of polarization by subgroups betwe
      ," MPRA Paper 14390, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. repec:bla:revinw:v:63:y:2017:i:4:p:608-632 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Flachaire, Emmanuel & Núñez, Olivier, 2003. "Estimation of income distribution and detection of subpopulations: an explanatory model," DES - Working Papers. Statistics and Econometrics. WS ws030201, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Estadística.
    6. Khan, Haider Ali & Schettino, Francesco & Gabriele, Alberto, 2017. "Polarization and the Middle Class in China: a Non-Parametric Evaluation Using CHNS and CHIP Data," MPRA Paper 86133, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Mary C. Daly & Robert G. Valletta, 2000. "Inequality and poverty in the United States: the effects of changing family behavior and rising wage dispersion," Working Paper Series 2000-06, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    8. Lubrano, Michel & Ndoye, Abdoul Aziz Junior, 2016. "Income inequality decomposition using a finite mixture of log-normal distributions: A Bayesian approach," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 830-846.
    9. Canto, Olga, 2000. "Income Mobility in Spain: How Much Is There?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(1), pages 85-102, March.
    10. Birchenall, Javier A., 2001. "Income distribution, human capital and economic growth in Colombia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 271-287, October.
    11. Roberto Ezcurra, 2009. "Does Income Polarization Affect Economic Growth? The Case of the European Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 267-285.
    12. Josep Oliver Alonso & Xavier Ramos & José Luis Raymond-Bara, 2001. "Recent trends in Spanish Income Distribution: A Robust Picture of Falling Income Inequality," Working Papers wp0107, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    13. Ezcurra, Roberto & Gil, Carlos & Pascual, Padro & Rapun, Manuel, 2002. "Mobility and regional inequality in the European Union: Implications for economic policy," ERSA conference papers ersa02p212, European Regional Science Association.
    14. Keshab Raj Bhattarai & Jonathan Haughton & David Tuerck, 2015. "Fiscal Policy, Growth and Income Distribution in the UK and the US," EcoMod2015 8607, EcoMod.

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