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Initial Conditions, Social Capital and Growth in Africa

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  • Temple, Jonathan

Abstract

Observable variables capturing initial conditions can account for well over half of the variation in developing country growth rates. This paper investigates their role in explaining Africa's recent economic history. Should the origins of slow growth be traced to Africa's social arrangements, high inequality and ethnic diversity? Based on cross-country empirical work, this paper argues that the best answers are yes, no and maybe. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Temple, Jonathan, 1998. "Initial Conditions, Social Capital and Growth in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 7(3), pages 309-347, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:7:y:1998:i:3:p:309-47
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    2. repec:fth:oxesaf:97-2.1 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus, 1996. "Fiscal Adjustment and Growth: In and Out of Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 5(3), pages 7-59, October.
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    6. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, "undated". "The Productivity of Nations," Working Papers 96012, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    7. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    8. Clarke, George R. G., 1995. "More evidence on income distribution and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 403-427, August.
    9. J. Bradford De Long & Lawrence H. Summers, 1991. "Equipment Investment and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 445-502.
    10. Mick Moore, 1997. "Societies, polities and capitalists in developing countries: A literature survey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(3), pages 287-363.
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    12. Ghura, Dhaneshwar, 1995. "Macro Policies, External Forces, and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(4), pages 759-778, July.
    13. Bertocchi, Graziella & Canova, Fabio, 2002. "Did colonization matter for growth?: An empirical exploration into the historical causes of Africa's underdevelopment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1851-1871, December.
    14. Jonathan Temple, 1997. "St Adam and the Dragons: Neo-classical economics and the East Asian miracle," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 279-300.
    15. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 1992. "Political Instability and Economic Growth: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(4), pages 829-841, July.
    16. Sachs, Jeffrey D & Warner, Andrew M, 1997. "Sources of Slow Growth in African Economies," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 6(3), pages 335-376, October.
    17. Gyimah-Brempong, Kwabena, 1991. "Export Instability and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(4), pages 815-828, July.
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