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Accounting for Tastes: Correlates of Risk and Time Preferences

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  • J. Paul Leigh

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Suggested Citation

  • J. Paul Leigh, 1986. "Accounting for Tastes: Correlates of Risk and Time Preferences," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(1), pages 17-31, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:9:y:1986:i:1:p:17-31
    DOI: 10.1080/01603477.1986.11489597
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bernd Hayo & Florian Neumeier, 2016. "Political Leaders' Socioeconomic Background and Public Budget Deficits: Evidence from OECD Countries," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 55-78, March.
    2. Dániel Horn & Hubert János Kiss, 2020. "Time preferences and their life outcome correlates: Evidence from a representative survey," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(7), pages 1-26, July.
    3. OUATTARA, Aboudou & DE LA BRUSLERIE, Hubert, 2015. "The term structure of psychological discount rate: characteristics and functional forms," MPRA Paper 75111, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Thomas Epper & Ernst Fehr & Helga Fehr-Duda & Claus Thustrup Kreiner & David Dreyer Lassen & Søren Leth-Petersen & Gregers Nytoft Rasmussen, 2020. "Time Discounting and Wealth Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 110(4), pages 1177-1205, April.
    5. Daniel Horn & Hubert Janos Kiss, 2018. "Which preferences associate with school performance?—Lessons from an exploratory study with university students," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(2), pages 1-32, February.
    6. Kaiser, Ulrich & Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj, 2011. "Is self-employment really a bad experience?: The effects of previous self-employment on subsequent wage-employment wages," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 572-588, September.
    7. Hayo Bernd & Neumeier Florian, 2019. "Public Preferences for Government Spending Priorities: Survey Evidence from Germany," German Economic Review, De Gruyter, vol. 20(4), pages 1-37, December.
    8. Lougui, Monia & Broström, Anders, 2020. "The Labor Market Value of Experience from Temporary Self-employment," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 484, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    9. Edoka, I.P., 2012. "Decomposing Differences in Cotinine Distribution between Children and Adolescents from Different Socioeconomic Backgrounds," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/29, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    10. Thomas Epper & Helga Fehr-Duda & Adrian Bruhin, 2011. "Viewing the future through a warped lens: Why uncertainty generates hyperbolic discounting," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 169-203, December.
    11. Leigh, J. Paul & Dhir, Rachna, 1997. "Schooling and frailty among seniors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 45-57, February.
    12. Grossman, Michael, 2006. "Education and Nonmarket Outcomes," Handbook of the Economics of Education, in: Erik Hanushek & F. Welch (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Education, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 10, pages 577-633, Elsevier.
    13. Thomas DeLeire & Helen Levy, 2004. "Worker Sorting and the Risk of Death on the Job," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(4), pages 925-954, October.
    14. Harrell Chesson & W. Viscusi, 2003. "Commonalities in Time and Ambiguity Aversion for Long-Term Risks ," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 54(1), pages 57-71, February.
    15. Mark Schneider, 2016. "Dual Process Utility Theory: A Model of Decisions Under Risk and Over Time," Working Papers 16-23, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    16. Mark Schneider, 2018. "A Dual System Model of Risk and Time Preferences," Working Papers 18-18, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    17. Andreas C. Drichoutis & Panagiotis Lazaridis & Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr, 2009. "On Consumers' Valuation Of Nutrition Information," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 223-247, July.
    18. Dawoon Jung & Tushar Bharati & Seungwoo Chin, 2020. "Does Education Affect Time Preference? Evidence from Indonesia," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 20-17, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    19. Leigh, J. Paul, 1998. "Parents' schooling and the correlation between education and frailty," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 349-358, June.

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